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Opinion

Editorial Cartoons of the Week


Bad recipes and why I keep them

Fueled by a rare rush of spring cleaning adrenaline, I lifted the bloated behemoth off of my crowded shelf of cookbooks, careful to catch the loose clippings stuffed haphazardly between her cracked covers. The 30-year-old binder full of collected recipes was surely in need of a good purge after all this time.

Supreme Court decision on at-home worship wisely supported religious liberty

The court’s decision in Tandon sends a clear and important message to state and local governments that they cannot trample religious liberty while exempting their political allies and favored industries — such as Hollywood and big-box retailers — many of which lobbied hard for special treatment.

If the Taliban take power again, will Afghans have died in vain?

Despite the petty, self-destructive behavior of the political elite, and despite the still-powerful hold of religious and tribal taboos, Afghanistan is a far different country than it was when the Taliban seized power in 1996. Even if the Taliban retakes control, that can't be completely erased.


OPINION

Canceling youth sports has taken a toll on athletes

Active kids are more likely to become active adults, and to pass along their good habits. The pandemic interrupted this virtuous cycle.


OPINION

Biden offers false hope to sell his Afghanistan surrender

A day before word of Biden’s decision to withdraw by Sept. 11 leaked to the press, the Taliban announced they will not participate in peace talks in Turkey. That means the U.S. will be leaving Afghanistan’s government to fend for itself in the midst of a civil war. This is an ideal opportunity for a hobbled al-Qaida to rebuild.


OPINION

US can never move Iran to the back burner

Iran’s nuclear program, as I have explained, exists for the sole purpose of menacing its neighbors. The bigger the program gets, the more threatening it becomes — and the greater the motivation for those it threatens to prevent its completion.

Signs of spring: Flora, fauna, fur

What does the month of April represent to you? For those of us north of the equator, we’re watching new bees buzzing among the spring daffodils.


OPINION

The libertarian case against voting restrictions

Voting is effectively the final opportunity for the objects of government coercion to have a say in who gets to coerce them. The freedom to have that say is the last thing a libertarian would want those holding power at any particular moment to constrain.


OPINION

Don't let anything block US energy independence

Although the United States’ energy reserves and domestic production capabilities would have enabled it to endure a lengthier blockage, current efforts to forcibly shift the United States away from traditional fuel sources will leave it more exposed to future disruptions. The Ever Given fiasco demonstrates why such an approach is fundamentally irresponsible.

OPINION

Biden cannot allow Iran to keep its weapons program

Even as it negotiated the JCPOA, Iran was not only holding blueprints for a nuclear weapon, but also maintaining a constellation of physical sites where it could eventually build one.


OPINION

Fauci and Walensky can start being candid

Authorities held back from saying what they believed to be true because they thought it would elicit undesirable behaviors from the public.


OPINION

Tax cuts vs. big spending is the debate of the decade

Essentially, compared to a pre-2017 baseline, President Joe Biden will pay for his spending plan with the revenue he’ll generate by undoing President Donald Trump’s tax cuts. And over time, we’ll get to see how the economy evolves under the Biden plan compared to the 2017 Republican plan.


OPINION

Social media reform must be fair, protect free speech

At the heart of the Section 230 debate is a disagreement regarding the importance of allowing Americans to speak their minds. Some want to reduce the chilling of speech by social media companies. And some want to use Section 230 reform as a way to chill speech still further. They want to ensure that speech communicated online is consistent with their worldviews.

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  • OPINION

    Check vets’ mental wellness at vaccination visit

    If we hope to effectively decrease the veteran suicide rate, we need to evolve our approach. We need to take advantage of this opportunity to connect with our veterans, and when we do, take a proactive approach to introduce secure, private and trusted monitoring for our friends and loved ones for signs of distress.


  • OPINION

    Giving voters food and water is a political act

    It’s unrealistic to pretend that voting exists in a political or social vacuum. Voters are susceptible to all sorts of influences, from campaign ads to the opinions of family members in person or on Facebook. “Line warming” with food and drink is only part of the picture.


  • OPINION

    Will U.S. learn from a $1.7 trillion goof that would have paid for Biden's infrastructure plan?

    The massive swing-and-a-miss that is the F-35 — which already has the Pentagon dreaming of a new, new next-gen fighter that might actually be cheaper and easier to use — is just one symptom of a much greater problem: In spending more on war-related costs than the world's next 10 nations combined, the U.S. wastes billions on weapon systems that are ineffective and often not even needed.


  • OPINION

    The Tuskegee Airmen got him recognition. But it was family and community that brought the reward.

    Major L. Anderson II served his country when he was called to do so because it was the right thing to do. He served his community and his church because it was the right thing to do. And he made sure his wife and his sons had everything they needed - and much of what they wanted - because he knew it was what he was called to do.


  • OPINION

    There will be no peace in Afghanistan unless women’s rights are protected

    Taliban negotiators still insist women’s rights can only be viewed according to their ultraconservative interpretation of Islam.


  • OPINION

    Don’t believe the doomsayers. Vaccines will end the pandemic.

    The latest soaring discovery: a new CDC study showing vaccines sharply cut all COVID-19 infections — not just symptoms. That news puts to rest one worst-case-scenario: that vaccines might protect the vaccinated against hospitalization, but allow millions of silent infections to continue circulating.


  • OPINION

    On gun control, Vice President Harris faces the gap between campaign rhetoric and reality

    Harris is used to being her own boss. It's been that way since she was elected district attorney in 2003. But Harris has always been a willing student. Those who know her well say she has settled comfortably into the role of vice president, mindful of its constraints, including — not least — never getting out ahead of the president.


  • OPINION

    Mass media has had its humpty-dumpty moment

    Given the strength of the First Amendment, there always will be dissent and strong pushback against the view that journalism has evolved to a “just our facts,” not a “just the facts,” standard. There is also a real chance that the cultural sway of this view far exceeds its actual power to force societal change.


  • OPINION

    The military doesn't even know how bad its extremism problem is

    The siege on Capitol Hill was a stark reminder that extremism in and around the military is an issue that demands attention. To combat it, we need a longitudinal, preemptive approach that takes ownership for those who fail to honor the highest values for which the military stands, past and present. Institutional change is necessary, and it needs to happen smartly and quickly.


  • OPINION

    Rising gas prices: A look under the hood

    The poor legacy of market-distorting policies should serve as a warning for Biden. While it is inaccurate to blame the current administration for the recent rise in gas prices, actions made today will have long-lasting impacts.


  • OPINION

    The bane of all Asian Americans: ‘Where are you from?’

    I can tell you firsthand that by now, I’ve gotten my answer down to a succinct 30 seconds. It’s like an automatic reflex and frankly, it’s just easier than expending the energy required to explain why it’s a demonstration of passive racism to ask me in the first place. In choosing avoidance over confrontation, I realize now that I have inadvertently contributed to the “model minority” stereotype by holding my tongue.


  • OPINION

    Capitol attack fits statute’s definition of sedition

    The current statute contains a number of definitions for seditious conspiracy, including this: If two or more persons “conspire … by force to hinder or delay the execution of any law of the United States … they shall be fined … or imprisoned … or both." Those elements would appear to fit the actions of the worst Jan. 6 offenders like a glove.


  • Living with a not-so-smoothie operator

    My husband has been working from home since the pandemic began more than a year ago. Francis took his cybersecurity job in 2017 after retiring from the Navy, and initially commuted to New York City weekly. For those years, his neglected home office on the third floor of our house was more of a shrine than anything else. He would take friends up there on weekends to show off his military coins, plaques and photos. I called it his “Yay me!” room.


  • OPINION

    Reopening as COVID-19 fades is not a science

    There’s a lot science can tell us about relative risks of returning to normal activities, and it’s important for public health officials to keep people informed on any risks that might persist post-vaccine. But it’s time to stop disguising their preferred goals and trade-offs as “the science.”


  • OPINION

    Gulf States' new alliances reflect post-Cold War realities

    For the U.S. and Europe, these groupings represent new opportunities as well as new challenges. Cooperation between Israel and Arab states, for instance, may reduce the security burden on American shoulders, but their combined opposition to a nuclear accommodation with Iran will also greatly complicate President Joe Biden’s efforts to resume diplomacy with the Islamic Republic.


  • OPINION

    Keep civics education from splintering America

    Educating for American Democracy should be applauded for its “key concept” of building “civic friendship through informed civil dialogue and productive disagreement.” But its “Roadmap” feels more like the occupation of civics instruction by some groups who are neutral at best, and perhaps even intent on disrupting the notion of a shared national character.


  • OPINION

    Visitors to museum honoring past sacrifices unwilling to make present-day sacrifices

    The deeper one ventures into the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, the heavier the weight of all these past sacrifices. And then we had to go and blow it in the present.


  • OPINION

    Biden’s silence on Syria must end

    So far, it looks that the crisis that has created untold atrocities, included countless chemical weapons attacks, undermined medical neutrality, destabilized the European Union, fed into xenophobia and terrorism, and created the largest displacement of the population since World War II is not yet a priority of the new president. His two predecessors, and their policies, failed the Syrian people.


  • OPINION

    Look to the Reagan administration for the answer to the China challenge

    China is an economic juggernaut. Through its engagement with the United States and other major markets, it has made itself central to global supply chains, moved to dominate strategic industries and emerging technologies, and built up a military designed to win a war with the U.S. and its allies.


  • OPINION

    Biden’s tax hike wouldn’t spare the middle class

    Biden’s proposal to pay for new spending instead of financing it by piling on more debt is refreshing and laudable. But Mr. President, please look elsewhere to raise revenue.


  • OPINION

    War hero receives Silver Star 70 years late; he deserves Medal of Honor

    The man who saved two fellow Marines and then risked his life to kill the enemy deserved better. He deserved the best. Isn't that what he gave? But then again, maybe he never needed a medal to validate his heroics anyway.


  • OPINION

    Biden's virus relief bill victory might not start trend

    The moment of triumph is likely to be fleeting. Even sending $1,400 checks to most Americans can’t guarantee that Biden will be able to enact the rest of his ambitious agenda or hold on to Democrats’ majorities in Congress in next year’s midterm election.


  • Never too busy for milspouse time

    One would think that military spouses are busy enough, managing homes, children, jobs, pets, in-laws, bills, school, and other endless details, often while their active-duty partners are away. In fact, it would make sense if they turned away from added pressures, withdrew from obligations and isolated themselves altogether to maintain control. However, no matter how many plates military spouses spin in the air, they’re always game to add one more.


  • OPINION

    Next step is funding to bring K-9 veterans home

    Bringing K-9 veterans back home after service and ensuring they receive proper veterinary care can be a logistical nightmare too difficult to overcome.


  • OPINION

    And history’s 10,000-troop award goes to …

    As a longtime investigative journalist, I’m pleased to be able to share with you today the best evidence I’ve come across about what former President Donald Trump really knew – and knew before all hell erupted at the U.S. Capitol.


  • OPINION

    An admiral and a novelist want you to imagine a nuclear war with China

    It’s not that military and think tank experts aren’t discussing potential military conflicts with China, but Americans haven’t thought through the consequences.


  • OPINION

    Is scamming hard-wired? That's one explanation for the explosion of pandemic ripoffs.

    Criminals are exploiting COVID fear to trick Americans into divulging their Social Security numbers, Medicare and Medicaid ID numbers and other private medical information, according to the Federal Trade Commission.


  • OPINION

    When it comes to vaccinations, more is more

    How U.S. public officials and regulators talk about vaccination reflects an asymmetric treatment of errors of commission and omission.


  • OPINION

    Will life after COVID-19 be normal?

    Normal isn’t government permitting us to exercise our liberty. Normal means that we needn’t seek the government’s permission to exercise our liberty.


  • The grass is always greener where the dog drags you

    I remember it like it was yesterday. I was walking back to our stairwell apartment from dropping my daughter off at Patch Barracks Elementary School, minding my own business along Florida Strasse with our labradoodle, Dinghy. Suddenly, Dinghy spotted a hare munching grass in General So-and-so’s backyard.


  • OPINION

    Why traumatized people have a need to run for office

    The politicians I knew might have been Boy Scouts under the public gaze, but in private they were more like Lost Boys. After observing them up close for years and writing two books about them, I came to see patterns in their personal histories.


  • OPINION

    Lincoln Project’s schemes familiar to its adversaries

    Fleecing the poor, the elderly, the ignorant and the vulnerable for personal profit is a time-honored tradition for various swamp creatures. It’s also how certain “prosperity preacher” televangelists and evangelists have operated for years, as they accumulated jets, mansions and bursting bank accounts.


  • OPINION

    Apply lessons from abroad to improve US democracy

    Most Americans — including most local and state officials and their staff — lack practical knowledge about democratic innovation. We can gain some democratic inspiration and practical knowledge by taking a look at innovations in other countries. Particularly at the local and state or provincial levels, there are many lessons to learn.


  • What I found while losing my mind

    “Mom, do we have any photos of me and Dad when he came home from deployment?” our daughter asked, unwittingly sending me on a harrowing, epic journey through the storage spaces of our home.


  • OPINION

    Biden’s 1st military strike should wake up Iran

    The president has already pulled the U.S. back from the aggressive posture Trump adopted toward the Islamic Republic. But they can no longer believe that Biden will be as complaisant as Obama.


  • OPINION

    Baker, Panetta climbed that Hill for a worthy goal

    If you’d been in the Senate Intelligence Committee’s hearing room Wednesday you’d have realized that you were watching and listening to decades of Washington’s most famous titled newsmakers who were so eager to help they were virtually speaking at once.


  • OPINION

    How to end a very long war

    President Joe Biden's path toward ending a war that began three presidents ago has grown more difficult.


  • OPINION

    New Space Age hampered by old technology

    While recent space missions hold great promises and will prove transformative, we unfortunately lack the adequate deep-space propulsion capacity capable of carrying equipment and people reliably to the Moon, to Mars and beyond.


  • OPINION

    Iran's proxies pounce as Biden tries to negotiate

    Since President Joe Biden took office, Iran’s regional proxies have been busy.


  • OPINION

    Biden’s foreign policy success will depend on how America rebuilds at home

    Earlier this month President Joe Biden went to the State Department to pump up a demoralized foreign service corps, and to tell the world: “America is back. Diplomacy is back at the center of our foreign policy.”


  • OPINION

    The three factions vying for control of the GOP

    Like Julius Caesar’s Gaul, today’s Republican Party is divided into three parts: Never Trumpers, Sometimes Trumpers and Always Trumpers.


  • OPINION

    Returning to 'normal' is among the worst things we could do post-pandemic

    While it still feels like normalcy is a long way off, given the abysmal start to COVID-19 vaccine distribution, there is finally an end to the pandemic in sight — even if it’s months down the road. The question is: What will it look like?


  • Don't throw the honorable out with the bathwater

    Recently, the reputation of the military has been tarnished by Capitol riot reports indicating that a significant number of those arrested have served. Although extremism in the ranks is not a new problem, Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin saw the riot as a “wake-up call.” On Feb. 3, Austin ordered a 60-day stand-down for all military commanders to meet with troops to discuss racism and extremism.


  • OPINION

    Cybersecurity is not a tech problem, it's a matter of national survival

    Cyber makes it sound like it belongs only to the province of the computer savvy, the geeks, as if it is some secondary technical problem that has a permanent fix. It is not.


  • OPINION

    Japanese public needs to know SDF to appreciate it

    Given the threats facing Japan, it may benefit the Japanese public to better understand the value of the SDF as an armed force and the military cooperation that takes place with the United States.


  • Weird habits picked up during pandemic monotony

    “Honey,” my retired Navy husband woke me this morning with a steaming cup of coffee — a sweet routine he started since he began working from home last March — “I just transferred money into your account because you’re twenty bucks in the red. Now, I know you had to buy Anna’s birthday gifts and groceries, so it’s no big deal, but please … just don’t buy any more stock, okay?” Busted.


  • OPINION

    Guide vets as they use benefits they earned

    We hope that policymakers will work together to defend veterans’ earned benefits and protect their college options and that the VA will improve the Transition Assistance Program.


  • Military spouses' best-kept secret

    This morning, I peered at my baggy, bloodshot eyes in the bathroom mirror. It had been a rough night. Thanks to wild fluctuations in my hormones, my hair was a rat's nest of sweaty tangles. I tossed two Tylenol down my gullet, hoping to relieve a crick in my neck from tossing and turning, and headache pangs from grinding my teeth. “Today’s gonna suck,” I admitted to myself with a defeated sigh.


  • OPINION

    VA should rein in predatory for-profit schools

    In light of the many complicated issues facing Denis McDonough at VA, one of his easiest decisions should be to stop the fleecing of America’s military heroes.


  • Custard's last stand: Cleaning my fridge

    I couldn’t wait for 2020 to be over. I sprinted out of that abysmal year like I was escaping a burning building … only to find that 2021 was smoldering, too.


  • OPINION

    Biden should use Afghanistan exit plan he inherited

    The Biden administration’s best course of action is to continue the current U.S. troop drawdown in Afghanistan. There is nothing left in Afghanistan for the U.S. to win.


  • OPINION

    Get tough with, but also work with, the Taliban

    As President Joe Biden takes office, he will find an old dossier on his desk, and he’ll have to decide what to do about it. It’s the Afghanistan case, and it could become his first foreign policy crisis.


  • Learning to lose now in order to win in the long run

    This month, we all bore witness to the horrific extremes that some people will go to in order to avoid losing. Although no one wants to fail, the vast majority of us won’t turn to insurrection, violent assault or malicious destruction of property to win.

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