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Click here for this week’s European Volksmarch schedule.

Koblenz after-action report: Oct. 27 was a day filled with “oohs,” “aahs,” and “wows” as the Koblenz-Karthause walk turned out to be all we expected and more.

We have done this walk on two other occasions and were looking forward to another excellent walk. We were not disappointed. Well, the sun might have been a bit more cooperative, but it did not rain and the temperature was just right for walking.

The autumn colors of the trees were like “nature’s own fireworks display,” to quote our favorite tiger, Hobbes. We were amazed by the shades of gold, red, green and orange on the trees. The 10- kilometer trail had several scenic lookouts over the Mosel river, complete with benches so one could sit and enjoy the view.

Once back at the start hall, we had our first Erbsensuppe (pea soup) of the season, along with kraut salad and potato salad. We saw a woman hand-painting Christmas decorations on glass centerpieces that hold four tea lights and just had to have one. We even saw our friend “The Sock Man,” who was selling his wide assortment of Falke walking socks.

It was an excellent walk on a beautiful day with great food at the end. It was well worth the long drive to enjoy this outstanding walk.

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If you live near Bamberg, Germany, or plan to be in the area this weekend, make sure you swing by Wachenroth and walk the 5 or 10 kilometer trails. Located southwest of Bamberg, the Wachenroth march in the past has gone through the rolling hills around the town. This year’s prize is a music box with an angel design — possibly an excellent Christmas gift.

The start times for the 5- and 10-kilometer trails are 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday and 7 a.m. to noon Sunday. Finish your march by 5 p.m. Saturday and by 4 p.m. Sunday.

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Don’t forget about the Ramstein Roadrunners’ Annual Thanksgiving Day Volksmarch. You’ll find more details in next week’s column about this event held in Ramstein, Germany, in the Turnhalle.

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In early December, we will be walking the permanent Volksmarch in Niederheimbach, Germany, in conjunction with our trip to the Christmas market in Rüdesheim. If you have done this walk, please drop us a line so we know what to expect.

It’s hard to beat the combination of a Volksmarch and a Christmas market, so let us know if you hear of a walk in the neighborhood of a market.

• • •

Thanks to the following walkers for mailing us envelopes of Volksmarching brochures in date order: Manfred Dahl, Lew Harrison, Wayne Henry, David Kuik, Diane Lockman, Tim and Luchi Lynch and Pat Patterson.

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Miscellaneous short notes about this week’s Volksmarch events:

• The prize for completing the walk in Untererthal, Germany, is a small bicycle-shaped object that might be used for holding pencils — or at least, that’s our best guess.

• This year the Volksmarch in Sulgen, Germany, has B-medals as a prize, but they might have some of last year’s snowmen available. They are about 13 inches tall, are wearing a green outfit with a hat and scarf and are holding a shovel.

The starting time for both days is between 7:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. You must finish by 5 p.m. The 5 km route is listed as stroller friendly.

• Another interesting prize is being offered by the folks in Schnaittach, Germany. Complete that walk and receive a set of figures for a Nativity scene.

• A Christmas bear named “Bruno” is the prize at Mandel, Germany, this weekend. “Bruno” comes with a stocking cap and scarf. The 6- and 10-kilometer walks start between 7 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, while the 20-kilometer route starts between 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. both days. Finish your respective trail each day by 5 p.m.

• Lew Harrison sent a note stating that the walk in Neufgrange, France, is a great walk and very popular.

• The Regensdorf, Switzerland, walk begins in the restaurant Feldschlösschen between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. (4 p.m. finish).

• Clark Soeldner, our Italian Volksmarching connection, says the Dueville walk is in a mix of fields and hills.

He adds that the Pinzano al Tagliamento is a great small town walk. It tends to be nippy in the morning, then it warms up, so dress in layers.

The full name for the city we listed as “Colloredo” is Colloredo di Soffumbergo-Faedis and the start of its walk is at Azienda Agricola Monte Balcone.

E-mail Volksmarch schedule information to two.walkers@yahoo.com. Mail brochures to Bob and Lorraine Huffaker, CMR 460, Box 278, APO, AE, 09703-0278.

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