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A council of municipal governments located near Wright-Patterson Air Force Base voted Thursday to hire a consultant to guide local governments on how best to shepherd development in a way that’s compatible with Wright-Patterson’s mission.

A council of municipal governments located near Wright-Patterson Air Force Base voted Thursday to hire a consultant to guide local governments on how best to shepherd development in a way that’s compatible with Wright-Patterson’s mission. (U.S. Air Force)

(Tribune News Service) — A council of municipal governments located near Wright-Patterson Air Force Base voted Thursday to hire a consultant to guide local governments on how best to shepherd development in a way that's compatible with Wright-Patterson's mission.

Council members voted to hire Matrix Design Group, based in Crofton, Md. The company's proposal was $249,490, council members said in a meeting in Fairborn.

Rob Anderson, Fairborn city manager, said the council received proposals from four companies, including one from Beavercreek-based Woolpert, an architecture, engineering, geospatial and consulting firm.

The council received a federal grant of about $350,000 to develop a "compatibility use" plan for shepherding development around sprawling Wright-Patterson, located in Greene County's northwestern corner — and close to several quickly growing communities, including Fairborn, Beavercreek, Huber Heights and others.

Matrix will complete that plan for the council.

"It makes sense to go with Matrix," Anderson said during the meeting. Members agreed, voting to hire the company.

According to its web site, Matrix offers clients development and planning services, consulting with governments and others.

Wright-Patterson officials have scheduled a public meeting to discuss what's called an "Air Installations Compatible Use Zones" or "AICUZ" study. The session will be at 6 p.m. April 27 in the Jones Room at Twin Base Golf Course.

The Department of Defense developed the compatible use zones program in response to urban development around military airfields, giving public officials guidance on how to develop in a way that does not hinder the mission of those airfields.

Communities and military bases work together in ways large and small whenever possible. One memorable example: About a decade ago, traffic flow in and near Fairborn was changed forever when Wright-Patterson took control of part of State Route 444 that cut through the base's Area A.

A more recent example: Last year, Fairborn began work on improving an area of land off state route 444 across from Wright-Patterson's gate 12A.

"The goal of the DOD Air Installations Compatible Use Zone program is to protect the health, safety and welfare of those living and working near air installations while sustaining the Air Force's operational mission," Stacey Geiger, a spokeswoman for Wright-Patterson's 88th Air Base Wing, told the Dayton Daily News last month.

"The AICUZ study at Wright-Patterson was conducted over the last year and has been completed," she said. "The results of the study will be briefed at the upcoming AICUZ open house on April 27."

There will be information booths with posters and handouts at the base's April 27 public session, the base has said in announcements about the meeting. The base asks attendees to arrive no later than 6 p.m.

(c)2022 the Dayton Daily News (Dayton, Ohio)

Visit the Dayton Daily News (Dayton, Ohio) at www.daytondailynews.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


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