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Wounded Warriors
Trevor Greene, a former Canadian soldier who suffered a brain injury during an attack in Afghanistan in 2006, walks with a robotic exoskeleton, Sept. 17, 2015, at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia. This is the first time exoskeleton technology, designed for those with spinal cord injuries, has been used for a person with a brain injury, said SFU professor Carolyn Sparrey.<br>Courtesy of Simon Fraser University

Robotic exoskeleton helps vet with brain injury walk again

Canadian army veteran Trevor Greene calls himself the “bionic” man. Told he might never walk again after suffering a brain injury during a 2006 ax attack in Afghanistan, Green is now mobile with the help of a robotic exoskeleton on the lower half of his body, according to Simon Fraser University.

Army Sgt. Michael Buccieri, Madigan Army Medical Center Warrior Transition Battalion at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., bonds with Davis, a horse used in the hippotherapy program offered by the Heartbeat Serving Wounded Warriors organization April 9, 2013. Buccieri was wounded while serving as a military policeman in Afghanistan.<br>Jennifer Spradlin/U.S. Army

Injured troops use Lewis-McChord competitions to speed up healing

The weekend event aims to help about 120 wounded, ill and injured military servicemembers leave Joint Base Lewis-McChord feeling better and inspired by each other to overcome new obstacles.

Cpl. Toran Gaal, assigned to Wounded Warrior West Battalion Balboa Detachment at Naval Medical Center San Diego, sits in the cabin of a MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter while Lt. Spencer Hunt answers questions during a tour of HSC-3 in May, 2013.<br>Amanda Huntoon/U.S. Navy

Double amputee, single amputee make cross-country ride to benefit Semper Fi Fund

Four years ago on June 26, an improvised explosive device blew U.S. Marine Sgt. Toran Gaal’s left leg off, severely damaged his right leg, crushed the left side of his head and claimed part of his brain. This summer, he will propel a hand cycle east into Missouri on a 3,000-plus mile trip across the U.S.

 

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