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Victims lay on the pavement outside a Paris restaurant, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015.

Victims lay on the pavement outside a Paris restaurant, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. (Thibault CamusAP)

Victims lay on the pavement outside a Paris restaurant, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015.

Victims lay on the pavement outside a Paris restaurant, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. (Thibault CamusAP)

People attend a vigil outside the French consulate in Montreal, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau offered "all of Canada's support" to France on Friday night in the wake of "deeply worrying" terrorist attacks in Paris.

People attend a vigil outside the French consulate in Montreal, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau offered "all of Canada's support" to France on Friday night in the wake of "deeply worrying" terrorist attacks in Paris. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press via AP)

People light candles at a vigil outside the French consulate in Montreal, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau offered "all of Canada's support" to France on Friday night in the wake of "deeply worrying" terrorist attacks in Paris.

People light candles at a vigil outside the French consulate in Montreal, Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau offered "all of Canada's support" to France on Friday night in the wake of "deeply worrying" terrorist attacks in Paris. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press via AP)

A victim is being evacuated from the Bataclan concert hall after a shooting in Paris, France, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015. Well over 100 people were killed in Paris on Friday night in a series of shooting, explosions. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders.

A victim is being evacuated from the Bataclan concert hall after a shooting in Paris, France, Saturday, Nov. 14, 2015. Well over 100 people were killed in Paris on Friday night in a series of shooting, explosions. French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency and announced that he was closing the country's borders. (Kamil Zihnioglu/AP Photo)

People react in front of   the Carillon cafe and the Petit Cambodge restaurant  in Paris Saturday Nov. 14, 2015, a day after attacks in Paris left at least 127 dead.

People react in front of the Carillon cafe and the Petit Cambodge restaurant in Paris Saturday Nov. 14, 2015, a day after attacks in Paris left at least 127 dead. (Jerome Delay/AP)

STUTTGART, Germany — U.S. European Command’s top officer said the military is prepared to offer support if needed to ally France in the wake of the Friday terror attacks in Paris that killed more than 120 people.

EUCOM also is working to verify that all Defense Department personnel are safe and accounted for. So, far there are no indications that military members were snared in the attack, EUCOM said.

“My deepest sympathies go out to the people of Paris and France, and all those impacted by these horrific terror attacks,” EUCOM commander Gen. Philip M. Breedlove said. “We will assist in any way our military can. We will continue to stand beside our oldest NATO Ally to deter, disrupt and defeat terrorists who threaten our values, freedoms and our way of life.”

On Saturday, U.S. Army Europe asked its commanders to account for all their personnel in the wake of the Friday terror attacks in Paris that killed more than 120 people.

Tenant commands and mission support elements are to ensure all soldiers, civilians and contractors are accounted for, USAREUR said in a memo issued to staff. The Army also is assessing whether additional force-protections measures are required, USAREUR stated.

Late Friday, Defense Secretary Ash Carter offered words of solidarity to NATO ally France, a country that is part of the U.S.-led coalition taking part in air strikes against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

Carter spoke by phone with his French counterpart, Jean-Yves Le Drian, reaffirming that the U.S. stands ready to provide support if called upon.

The attack in Paris, which was carried out at multiple locations by attackers armed with AK-47s, is the second major attack in the French capital in less than a year. In January, 11 people were killed when Islamic terrorists attacked the French newspaper Charlie Hebdo, which had a history of religious satire.

In August, an attack on a French passenger train was thwarted when U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Spencer Stone and two friends subdued an armed Islamic extremist who was attempting to launch an attack.

vandiver.john@stripes.com

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John covers U.S. military activities across Europe and Africa. Based in Stuttgart, Germany, he previously worked for newspapers in New Jersey, North Carolina and Maryland. He is a graduate of the University of Delaware.

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