Support our mission
 
A wall display at Shinjuku Station in central Tokyo celebrates the 35th anniversary of the Super Mario Bros. video game franchise, Nov. 4, 2020.
A wall display at Shinjuku Station in central Tokyo celebrates the 35th anniversary of the Super Mario Bros. video game franchise, Nov. 4, 2020. (Akifumi Ishikawa/Stars and Stripes)
A wall display at Shinjuku Station in central Tokyo celebrates the 35th anniversary of the Super Mario Bros. video game franchise, Nov. 4, 2020.
A wall display at Shinjuku Station in central Tokyo celebrates the 35th anniversary of the Super Mario Bros. video game franchise, Nov. 4, 2020. (Akifumi Ishikawa/Stars and Stripes)
An oversized box-art exhibit chronicles the history of the Super Mario Bros. video game franchise at Shinjuku Station in Tokyo, Nov. 4, 2020.
An oversized box-art exhibit chronicles the history of the Super Mario Bros. video game franchise at Shinjuku Station in Tokyo, Nov. 4, 2020. (Akifumi Ishikawa/Stars and Stripes)
A woman walks past a Tokyo Station exhibit celebrating the 35th anniversary of the Super Mario Bros. video game franchise, Nov. 4, 2020.
A woman walks past a Tokyo Station exhibit celebrating the 35th anniversary of the Super Mario Bros. video game franchise, Nov. 4, 2020. (Akifumi Ishikawa/Stars and Stripes)
People check out Tokyo Station murals celebrating the 35th anniversary of the Super Mario Bros. video game franchise, Nov. 4, 2020.
People check out Tokyo Station murals celebrating the 35th anniversary of the Super Mario Bros. video game franchise, Nov. 4, 2020. (Akifumi Ishikawa/Stars and Stripes)

TOKYO — It’s been 35 years since a chubby little plumber named Mario first took on an army of Goombas, Koopa Troopas and, ultimately, Bowser, all in the name of saving a princess named Peach.

The Japanese capital is celebrating the 1985 debut of Super Mario Bros., one of the world’s most popular video game franchises, with history and art displays at two of its largest train stations.

An oversized box-art exhibit at Shinjuku Station’s south exit chronicles the game’s history, from its 1980s beginnings to modern day titles. Meanwhile, murals at Tokyo Station honor many of the franchise’s most iconic characters, heroes and villains alike.

Both exhibits will be up until Nov. 23; however, central Tokyo remains off-limits to most U.S. service members and their families because of coronavirus restrictions.

news@stripes.com Twitter: @StarsAndStripes

Migrated

stars and stripes videos

around the web

Sign Up for Daily Headlines

Sign-up to receive a daily email of today’s top military news stories from Stars and Stripes and top news outlets from around the world.

Sign up