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Philisa Legrier hits a forehand winner during the womens doubles final match at the U.S. Forces Europe Tennis Championship in Heidelberg, Germany, on Sunday.

Philisa Legrier hits a forehand winner during the womens doubles final match at the U.S. Forces Europe Tennis Championship in Heidelberg, Germany, on Sunday. (Raymond T. Conway / S&S)

Philisa Legrier hits a forehand winner during the womens doubles final match at the U.S. Forces Europe Tennis Championship in Heidelberg, Germany, on Sunday.

Philisa Legrier hits a forehand winner during the womens doubles final match at the U.S. Forces Europe Tennis Championship in Heidelberg, Germany, on Sunday. (Raymond T. Conway / S&S)

Lynda Hewitt returns a backhand during the womens doubles final match at the U.S. Forces Europe Tennis Championship in Heidelberg, Germany, on Sunday.

Lynda Hewitt returns a backhand during the womens doubles final match at the U.S. Forces Europe Tennis Championship in Heidelberg, Germany, on Sunday. (Raymond T. Conway / S&S)

Joel Bond returns a serve during a semi-final doubles match at the U.S. Forces Europe Tennis Championship in Heidelberg, Germany, on Sunday.

Joel Bond returns a serve during a semi-final doubles match at the U.S. Forces Europe Tennis Championship in Heidelberg, Germany, on Sunday. (Raymond T. Conway / S&S)

Doug Whitney, left, and Jim Hewitt congratulate each other after the championship match in the 30-39 age division at the U.S. Forces Europe Tennis Championship in Heidelberg, Germany, on Sunday.

Doug Whitney, left, and Jim Hewitt congratulate each other after the championship match in the 30-39 age division at the U.S. Forces Europe Tennis Championship in Heidelberg, Germany, on Sunday. (Raymond T. Conway / S&S)

Jim Moss hits a backhand against Dennis Kirstein during the championship match in the over-40 division at the U.S. Forces Europe Tennis Championship in Heidelberg, Germany, on Sunday.

Jim Moss hits a backhand against Dennis Kirstein during the championship match in the over-40 division at the U.S. Forces Europe Tennis Championship in Heidelberg, Germany, on Sunday. (Raymond T. Conway / S&S)

HEIDELBERG, Germany — The four singles titles decided Sunday in the U.S. Forces Europe tennis championships were evenly divided between retention and redemption.

Men’s open champion Roy Tannis of Darmstadt and women’s champion Philisa Legrier of Heidelberg retained their titles in straight sets. Tannis downed Sundy Muniz of RAF Dawes Hill, England, 6-1, 6-2 and Legrier defeated Susan Flynn 6-2, 6-1.

Redemption came to 60-year-old masters champion Jim Moss of Kaiserslautern, who topped the player who defeated him in last year’s semifinals, Mannheim’s Dennis Kirstein, 2-6, 6-4, 7-5, and to seniors champion Jim Hewitt of Brunssum, Netherlands. Hewitt reversed the outcome of last year’s title match for players aged 30-39 by downing Heidelberg’s Doug Whitney 6-2, 6-4.

“I felt pretty good right from the start,” said Hewitt, who lost to Whitney, a 50-year-old who prefers playing seniors, 3-6, 3-6, last year. “It was nice to get the win.”

Moss felt the same way after settling the score against Kirstein.

Asked what was working for him on Sunday, Moss, a University of Maryland English and philosophy teacher who suffered a stroke 14 months ago, answered, “Willpower.”

“I played five sets of doubles yesterday that he didn’t play," Moss said. “Last year he beat me 7-5 in the final set. I was happy to get back at him.”

Moss added that he was happy to get back at all, never mind against whom.

“I feel good just to be alive,” Moss said. “A year ago May 21, I couldn’t walk and could barely talk. This is a tribute to the doctors at Landstuhl (Regional) Medical Center.”

Tannis, who beat Muniz 6-2, 6-1 in last year’s title match, was just as dominant this year. The Darmstadt ace rarely went to his second serve on Sunday, but Muniz said return of service was the least of his problems.

“He killed me,” Muniz said, “but it wasn’t his serve. He beat me with shot placement. He wore me out running me around.”

Tannis agreed.

“He has a very solid all-around game,” Tannis said, “but I think conditioning made the difference. He gets a little tired.”

Tannis ended both sets by breaking Muniz’s service.

“I saw him play Wednesday,” Tannis said, “and I was able to read his serve pretty well.”

For the second straight year, Legrier won two titles despite being deserted by an important part of her game. After downing Flynn for the singles crown, she teamed with Leah Creiglow of Heidelberg to win the women’s doubles crown 6-2, 6-0 over Lynda Hewitt and Renee Riddle.

“My serve was awful today,” the former West Georgia University varsity player said. “I didn’t get many first serves in.”

Creiglow also was a double winner. In addition to her share of the women’s doubles crown, she teamed with 62-year-old Jim Matsosek to take the mixed doubles crown 7-5, 7-6 (8-6) over Nelson McMicken and Wendy Kerr. It was the duo’s second straight mixed doubles crown.

Muniz, despite a sore right wrist, elbow and shoulder, teamed with Joel Bond to take the men’s doubles crown 6-3, 7-6 (7-4) over Jeff Kirdakorn and Kristopher Joseph.


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