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At Yokosuka Naval Hospital, Lt. Mari Nasin prepares to give Sophie Sakura Remington, born April 7th, a post-natal examination.

At Yokosuka Naval Hospital, Lt. Mari Nasin prepares to give Sophie Sakura Remington, born April 7th, a post-natal examination. (Jim Schulz / S&S)

At Yokosuka Naval Hospital, Lt. Mari Nasin prepares to give Sophie Sakura Remington, born April 7th, a post-natal examination.

At Yokosuka Naval Hospital, Lt. Mari Nasin prepares to give Sophie Sakura Remington, born April 7th, a post-natal examination. (Jim Schulz / S&S)

Lt. Marjorie Nasin, Pediatrician, uses a Japanese toy to help a young patient blow air as she listens to his breathing.

Lt. Marjorie Nasin, Pediatrician, uses a Japanese toy to help a young patient blow air as she listens to his breathing. (Tom Watanabe / U.S. Navy)

Lt. Marjorie Nasin opened her e-mail. The subject line: “YOU ARE THE WINNER!”

Most folks don’t even bother to open messages with such grandiose subject headings, but it sparked just enough curiosity for her to open the file.

It’s a good thing she did.

The e-mail informed Nasin she is one of two Navy pediatricians of the year selected by the American Academy of Pediatrics, Uniform Services Chapter.

“I had no idea. It came as a wonderful surprise, and I’m very proud of it,” the 31-year-old physician said recently from her Yokosuka Naval Hospital office.

Nasin said she was nominated for the award by fellow doctors at the hospital.

“That says wonderful things about the people you work with,” she said.

The title was presented recently in Washington at the 37th Annual American Academy of Pediatrics, Uniformed Services Seminar.

“They gave me a very nice plaque,” she said, “and they funded my trip.”

Nasin leads Yokosuka’s Perinatal Advisory Committee, responsible for prenatal and immediate post-partum care.

The Perinatal Advisory Committee focuses “on how to optimize the quality of care and the breadth of services we have for the military families overseas … not just on the emergency situations, but also the entire spectrum of care,” Nasin said.

“I am trained as a general pediatrician. And pediatricians overseas are encouraged, in part because of necessity, to pursue specialized interests,” she added.

“That way we can ‘become’ the local expert in a specialty, and we all share that workload,” she said. “My interest happens to be perinatal medicine.”

Nasin also coordinates Yokosuka’s Pediatric Advanced Life Support training, and according to a hospital news report, she recently started teaching a course on how to transport newborns with critical health-care needs.

Meanwhile, this particular doctor wears at least “two hats” at the hospital — administrator and physician.

“As an administrator, I am interested in patients actually from before conception and how we can make the services current with the standard of care from throughout America,” Nasin said. “As a physician, and actually providing treatment, I step in the minute the baby is born.”

“I think the most important issue I can help parents with is just how to foster their children’s development throughout their children’s life,” she said.

It’s a very different proposition for parents to foster the development of a 2-year-old, compared to a 13-year-old, she said.

“It is an amazing thing to try to enable parents to give their children the skills to become independent, thriving individuals. And it’s great. It’s great to see kids change from year to year and grow up to be self-aware and have lots of confidence,” Nasin said.

“That’s the best thing we can do as providers,” she said.


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