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Yokosuka civilian Chris Lohr has lived in Japan for the past three years, painting and sculpting in her Sagamihara studio. Lohr, 59, a spokeswoman for Yokosuka’s U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Far East, will show "Michaela" in a free paintings and video exhibit at Hamayuukaikan Cultural Arts Building in Kinugasa from Friday to Sunday.

Yokosuka civilian Chris Lohr has lived in Japan for the past three years, painting and sculpting in her Sagamihara studio. Lohr, 59, a spokeswoman for Yokosuka’s U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Far East, will show "Michaela" in a free paintings and video exhibit at Hamayuukaikan Cultural Arts Building in Kinugasa from Friday to Sunday. (Photos courtesy of Chris Lohr)

Yokosuka civilian Chris Lohr has lived in Japan for the past three years, painting and sculpting in her Sagamihara studio. Lohr, 59, a spokeswoman for Yokosuka’s U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Far East, will show "Michaela" in a free paintings and video exhibit at Hamayuukaikan Cultural Arts Building in Kinugasa from Friday to Sunday.

Yokosuka civilian Chris Lohr has lived in Japan for the past three years, painting and sculpting in her Sagamihara studio. Lohr, 59, a spokeswoman for Yokosuka’s U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Far East, will show "Michaela" in a free paintings and video exhibit at Hamayuukaikan Cultural Arts Building in Kinugasa from Friday to Sunday. (Photos courtesy of Chris Lohr)

YOKOSUKA NAVAL BASE, Japan — Chris Lohr moved to Japan three years ago with more than just her dinette and living-room set.

The Yokosuka civilian brought 25 unfinished oil paintings, some longer than 5 feet.

Now the paintings are complete, and the public will have this weekend to see them before they are packed up for the return trip stateside, Lohr said Tuesday. She has called this work "the best of her life."

"Studio work is part of my life," Lohr said of bringing her work to Japan. "I have been an artist for 35 years. This part of my life is more important to me than household furniture — forget the pots and pans!"

By day, Lohr, 59, is a spokeswoman for Yokosuka’s U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Far East. But an Internet search reveals C. Kelly Lohr’s artistic identity as a composer, sculptor and painter.

Lohr will show "Michaela" in a free paintings and video exhibit at Hamayuukaikan Cultural Arts Building in Kinugasa from Friday to Sunday. The focus of the exhibit is a real-life story and study of a Nebraska dancer who modeled for Lohr for 14 months in Omaha, Lohr said.

"This is a very unusual story about a particular individual," Lohr said.

Without giving too much away, Lohr said the show will appeal to both Japanese and American audiences.

"I think everyone loves a Cinderella story. Everyone loves a miracle," Lohr said.

Lohr is soon retiring from government work and she and her husband will return stateside a few weeks after the exhibit, Lohr said.

Breaking into Japan’s art scene proved more difficult than she imagined, she said, and she and wanted to show her work before she left.

"I’ve loved every minute of living here," she said. "In a way, the Michaela story is a way of giving back."

The Lohr tour

Exhibit hours: Friday, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Saturday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Sunday, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

An on-site video in English is provided with Japanese subtitles.

How to get there: From Yokosuka Station, take the JR train south to Kinugasa. Exit the station, cross the street and turn right on the main street. Take the first left and walk one block across the waterway to the Hamayuukaikan Cultural Arts Building.


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