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Petty Officer 1st Class Clifford Sabo, of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Detachment Marianas, squats next to the 1,000-pound bomb discovered Monday at a construction site on U. S. Naval Base Guam. The EOD team determined the bomb was stable. They will remove the fuse on Saturday in order to safely transport it for disposal at the Naval Base Guam Ordnance Annex. During the procedure, a portion of the base will be temporarily closed and personnel in housing, offices and barracks relocated.
Petty Officer 1st Class Clifford Sabo, of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Detachment Marianas, squats next to the 1,000-pound bomb discovered Monday at a construction site on U. S. Naval Base Guam. The EOD team determined the bomb was stable. They will remove the fuse on Saturday in order to safely transport it for disposal at the Naval Base Guam Ordnance Annex. During the procedure, a portion of the base will be temporarily closed and personnel in housing, offices and barracks relocated. (Annette Donner/Courtesy of the U.S. Navy)

U.S. Naval Base Guam will be partially evacuated Saturday while an explosive ordnance team defuses a World War II-era bomb found buried at a base construction site, the Navy said Wednesday.

Workers discovered the artifact while digging with a backhoe near housing and offices Monday, according to a release.

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Detachment Marianas examined the find and will attempt to remove the fuse Saturday so the bomb can be safely moved to the base ordnance annex for disposal.

All people who live or work within 3,000 feet of the site must leave the area and all people within 5,000 must stay indoors from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday while the team works, the release said.

Also, security will restrict traffic to designated safe areas around the Navy Exchange and direct all base access through the back gate.

In the meantime, a 100-foot perimeter was set-up around the site and EOD said there is little danger of an explosion before the bomb is defused.

“This ordnance fell from thousands of feet, has been in place for 66 years almost to the day and was discovered when it was hit by a backhoe Monday and it did not detonate,” Brent Wadsworth, officer in charge of the EOD team, is quoted in the release.

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