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Five Wiesbaden youngsters have to do a delicate balancing act just to stay aboard an eight-foot-long skateboard built by Dean Carter and Brian Larrimer. Maneuvering the monster are, from left, Ken Reid, Bruno Crossill, Henry Zorn, and builders Carter and Larrimer.

Five Wiesbaden youngsters have to do a delicate balancing act just to stay aboard an eight-foot-long skateboard built by Dean Carter and Brian Larrimer. Maneuvering the monster are, from left, Ken Reid, Bruno Crossill, Henry Zorn, and builders Carter and Larrimer. (Ted Rohde/Stars and Stripes)

Five Wiesbaden youngsters have to do a delicate balancing act just to stay aboard an eight-foot-long skateboard built by Dean Carter and Brian Larrimer. Maneuvering the monster are, from left, Ken Reid, Bruno Crossill, Henry Zorn, and builders Carter and Larrimer.

Five Wiesbaden youngsters have to do a delicate balancing act just to stay aboard an eight-foot-long skateboard built by Dean Carter and Brian Larrimer. Maneuvering the monster are, from left, Ken Reid, Bruno Crossill, Henry Zorn, and builders Carter and Larrimer. (Ted Rohde/Stars and Stripes)

Dean Carter and Brian Larrimer with their skateboard.

Dean Carter and Brian Larrimer with their skateboard. (Ted Rohde/Stars and Stripes)

WIESBADEN, Germany — There are a lot of ways to make your mark on the world, but breaking records — especially those recorded in the Guinness Book of World Records — is gaining increased popularity.

Brian Larrimer and Dean Carter, both 14, are hoping to have their names added to the lengthy list in the record book. Their record? Building what they think is the longest skateboard ever.

During the mid-1960s, the skateboard found its way into almost every American home where children lived; its picture was plastered on the back of T-shirts and the sport of skateboarding even became the subject of rock 'n' roll songs.

Brian and Dean, 8th graders at Wiesbaden Junior High School, have written a letter to Guinness requesting their eight-foot-long skateboard be entered as a record length.

"I built the board in shop class," said Brian. "It was the biggest piece of wood I could find." The two mounted the wheels and painted the half-size surf board red, white and blue in their basement.

An average skateboard would be from nine to 12 inches long with two sets of roller skate wheels mounted at either end. "The Spirit of '76," as the boys call it, is eight feet long, seven inches wide and travels atop four sets of regular skate wheels

It's not the easiest thing in the world to ride and the two don't have any fancy tricks to display, but "it has to be the record," Dean said.

The boys think the skateboard will carry six kids "if they don't jump off." Dean said. "We have to plan our ride so that we jump off at the same time or else we'll crash."

Brian and Dean are waiting a reply from Guinness.


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