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Special Operations Command-Korea members glide toward the ground during a balloon-powered airborne exercise Feb. 13. The soldiers performed the exercise in cooperation with the 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Forces group from Fort Lewis, Wash., and elements of South Korean Army Special Forces.
Special Operations Command-Korea members glide toward the ground during a balloon-powered airborne exercise Feb. 13. The soldiers performed the exercise in cooperation with the 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Forces group from Fort Lewis, Wash., and elements of South Korean Army Special Forces. (Daniel Love / U.S. Army)

SEOUL — Special Forces soldiers from Washington state recently spent a week in South Korea to re-familiarize themselves with the South Korean mission, according to an 8th Army news release.

Members from 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group, of Fort Lewis, Wash., visited South Korea from Feb. 6-10 following a yearlong deployment to Afghanistan.

One of the visit’s goals was to help the group maintain its longstanding relationship with the South Korean Special Warfare Command, the news release stated.

On Feb. 8, members attended a briefing at the Combined Unconventional Warfare Task bunker. After being briefed by the South Koreans, 2nd Battalion members gave a briefing on lessons learned in Afghanistan.

U.S. and South Korean forces concluded the week with a joint airborne jump.

“Since we’re often busy with other deployments and missions, we wanted to take an opportunity to make sure we’re closely connected with the wartime operations plan,” Maj. Ian Rice, 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Forces group said in the news release. “It’s very important that we continue to train in Korea and keep a strong connection with our ROK Special Forces counterparts. Every time we get the chance, we enjoy working with them, continuing to build the bonds that were made in the past.”

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