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From the Stars and Stripes archives

USAFE briefs Murrow for Tripoli films

By THOMAS J. MULVEHILL | STARS AND STRIPES Published: April 9, 1956

WIESBADEN, Germany — Edward R. Murrow, producer and narrator of Columbia Broadcasting System's popular news show "See ft Now," visited Wiesbaden today en route to Wheelus Field, at Tripoli, where he will supervise shooting of material for inclusion in two hour-long future programs on Africa.

At his hotel here, Murrow discussed a wide variety of subjects with reporters, ranging from his feud with Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy (R-Wis.) to the current propaganda offensive of the Kremlin.

"I haven't seen the Senator from Wisconsin in some time," Murrow said with a grin in answer to a question concerning their relationship. (Murrow had drawn McCarthy's fire with one of his broadcasts and later invited the Senator to appear on a succeeding program which McCarthy did.)

Earlier today, Murrow, who until Thursday will be gathering news for his two programs on politics and economics in Africa, received a special briefing at USAFE Hq and was honored at a reception given by Maj Gen Mark E. Bradley, Jr., vice commander-in-chief of USAFE.

Murrow said his camera crew, which has been shooting scenes throughout Africa for the past six months, will visit USAFE's Matador tactical missile firing range at  Wheelus to film aerial rocketry and gunnery combat training operations there for inclusion in the two programs. He said the first program will he aired in the U.S. April 27, and the second early in May.

The busy producer's schedule includes flying to Libya tonight, interviews tomorrow with the prime minister of that country and with the Wheelus field commander, a flight to Algiers the following day to "pick up information on the rioting," and. return to the U.S. on Thursday in time to make his weekly "person to person" broadcast on Friday. Murrow will be accompanied to Africa by Lt Col William Berkeley, USAFE's acting informations services chief, who will act as escorting officer.

Murrow, who is a member of the board of directors of the Columbia Broadcasting System, said it would probably cost CBS about $250,000 to produce the two shows on Africa, "But it will be well worth it," he said, "because I think we in America know too little about Africa, its people, and their problems."
 

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