Quantcast

Condition of injured Army Golden Knights parachuters remains unchanged

A member of the U.S. Army Golden Knights carries the Prisoner of War flag as he parachutes in front of the crowd at Thunder Over the Rock Air and Space Show at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., on Nov. 27, 2018.

KRISTINE M. GRUWELL/U.S. AIR FORCE

By RACHAEL RILEY | The Fayetteville Observer | Published: February 14, 2019

FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (Tribune News Service) — Two members of the U.S. Army Golden Knights parachute team remain in critical condition Wednesday morning following a training exercise in Florida early Tuesday that left them injured, an Army spokesman said.

A third member of the team remains in serious condition, said Sgt. 1st Class Robert Dodge, a spokesman for the Army Recruiting Command, which the Fort Bragg-based team falls under.

“There are no updates at this time,” Dodge said Wednesday morning.

The Army is not releasing the names of the soldiers who were injured at this time, he said.

The Golden Knights fall under the Army Recruiting Command’s Marketing and Engagement Brigade. They are a Department of Defense-sanctioned aerial demonstration team, with about 95 men and women, the team’s website states.

A news release from the Recruiting Command on Tuesday said the soldiers were injured about 4 a.m. Tuesday at the Homestead Air Reserve Base in Homestead, Florida. The base is the winter training location for the Golden Knights.

“The soldiers are all members of the U.S. Army Parachute Team, the Golden Knights, and were participating in a routine night training operation,” Army officials said Tuesday.

Dodge said the Army is not releasing the cause of the accident at this time.

“A safety investigation team from the U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center, headquartered at Fort Rucker, Alabama, deployed to Homestead Air Force Base, Florida, to lead the investigation of the training mishap that occurred Tuesday,” he said Wednesday.

Florida television station WTVJ-NBC6 reported the soldiers were injured during a training exercise called a “halo jump,” where they were as high as 14,000 feet in the air before opening their chutes shortly before hitting the ground.

———
©2019 The Fayetteville Observer (Fayetteville, N.C.)
Visit The Fayetteville Observer (Fayetteville, N.C.) at www.fayobserver.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

from around the web