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On Sept. 19, 2017, more than 70 civilian employees of the U.S. Army in Katterbach, Germany, went on strike and protested for higher wages. The German union ver.di earlier this week accepted a 1.8 percent increase for all employees who receive more than 3,000 euros a month and a 2.1 percent increase for all employees who receive less than 3,000 euros.

On Sept. 19, 2017, more than 70 civilian employees of the U.S. Army in Katterbach, Germany, went on strike and protested for higher wages. The German union ver.di earlier this week accepted a 1.8 percent increase for all employees who receive more than 3,000 euros a month and a 2.1 percent increase for all employees who receive less than 3,000 euros. (Courtesy of Petra Fichtner)

KAISERSLAUTERN, Germany — A union that has been demanding better wages for German workers employed by the U.S. military has agreed to a smaller salary increase than it originally sought, the union said.

The German union ver.di earlier this week accepted a 1.8 percent increase for all employees who receive more than 3,000 euros a month and a 2.1 percent increase for all employees who receive less than 3,000 euros.

All employees also will receive a onetime 200-euro bonus payment in December, the union said in a statement.

Union members and all parties represented in the negotiation have until Oct. 16 to accept or reject the agreement, said Tobias Schuermann, who led the negotiations for ver.di.

The German Federal Finance Ministry, negotiating on behalf of U.S. forces, came to an agreement with the union for the new 12-month contract on Wednesday in Bonn for local nationals working with foreign forces based in the country.

The union previously asked for a 5 percent pay hike. Union members protested outside U.S. military bases at Ansbach, Katterbach and Illesheim, among others, to demand higher wages after rejecting a 1 percent pay increase offered by the U.S. and other foreign forces, the union said.

Schuermann said the new agreement would affect roughly 13,000 employees, including American workers the union bargains for in a few cases.

news@stripes.com

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