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U.S. soldiers from the 4th Chemical Company prepares a South Korean 16th Chemical Battalion soldier during decontamination training Tuesday at Camp Hovey. The two units trained together for the first time in several years.

U.S. soldiers from the 4th Chemical Company prepares a South Korean 16th Chemical Battalion soldier during decontamination training Tuesday at Camp Hovey. The two units trained together for the first time in several years. (Erik Slavin / S&S)

U.S. soldiers from the 4th Chemical Company prepares a South Korean 16th Chemical Battalion soldier during decontamination training Tuesday at Camp Hovey. The two units trained together for the first time in several years.

U.S. soldiers from the 4th Chemical Company prepares a South Korean 16th Chemical Battalion soldier during decontamination training Tuesday at Camp Hovey. The two units trained together for the first time in several years. (Erik Slavin / S&S)

U.S. soldiers from the 4th Chemical Company instruct South Korean 16th Chemical Battalion soldiers on decontaminating their boots.

U.S. soldiers from the 4th Chemical Company instruct South Korean 16th Chemical Battalion soldiers on decontaminating their boots. (Erik Slavin / S&S)

A U.S. soldier from the 4th Chemical Company decontaminates a vehicle.

A U.S. soldier from the 4th Chemical Company decontaminates a vehicle. (Erik Slavin / S&S)

A U.S. soldier decontaminates a vehicle during joint training with the South Korean military.

A U.S. soldier decontaminates a vehicle during joint training with the South Korean military. (Erik Slavin / S&S)

CAMP HOVEY, South Korea — The Army’s only operational chemical company on the peninsula showed its South Korean counterparts the latest techniques and equipment for removing chemical hazards Tuesday for the first time in several years.

Meanwhile, the U.S. 4th Chemical Company learned a few crafty tips from the 16th South Korean Chemical Battalion that it said it may add to its procedures.

About 70 soldiers from each nation observed and demonstrated each other’s procedures should they be attacked by a chemical agent.

The U.S. eight-step individual decontamination process is only five steps for the South Koreans, though they cover the same concepts.

U.S. troops rely on soap, water and Super Tropical Bleach as decontaminants, while the South Koreans swap out the bleach for charcoal cleanser.

"They’re both effective methods, they’re just different techniques," said Sgt. 1st Class Charles Dennis. "I’d be confident using their decontamination [procedures] that I’d be safe to fight."

Although the U.S. vehicles and protective equipment were newer than the South Korean gear, U.S. leaders say they were impressed with what they saw.

The South Koreans rig a truck to shower vehicles as they finish going through a decontamination line. The U.S. uses two soldiers with hoses.

"Something like that could free up manpower and keep us more mission effective," Pfc. Adrian Lang said.

Lt. Col. Richard Creed, First Brigade Special Troops Battalion commander, agreed and said the company could do the same thing. They may also mimic some relatively simple undercarriage washers that the South Koreans fabricated themselves, Creed said.

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