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Jason Heap, who submitted paperwork in June to become the Navy's first humanist chaplain, said the military needs to broaden its view of the chaplain's corps to better serve all troops.
Jason Heap, who submitted paperwork in June to become the Navy's first humanist chaplain, said the military needs to broaden its view of the chaplain's corps to better serve all troops. (Courtesy of Military Association)

WASHINGTON -- Jason Heap wants to be a Navy chaplain. But he doesn’t believe in God.

Belief in a higher power, the 38-year-old humanist argues, has nothing to do with that work.

“I am aware there are many who would be reticent or militant against that,” he said. “But at the end of the day, my job is not to inculcate my viewpoints onto other people. My job as a chaplain is to be a facilitator, someone who cares for people, someone who is a sounding board.”

Heap submitted his application to the Armed Forces Chaplains Board earlier this month, in an effort to become the first humanist chaplain in military history.

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