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U.S. Air Force pilots Capt. Kalae ?Inch? Leong, right, and Capt. Rodolfo ?Fuego? Orozco from RAF Lakenheath, England, stand in front of their F-15C Eagle fighter jet and offer passers-by posters, patches and T-shirts for a donation for charity at the Royal International Air Tattoo at RAF Fairford, England, on Saturday. Leong and Orozco are both assigned to the 494th Fighter Squadron.
U.S. Air Force pilots Capt. Kalae ?Inch? Leong, right, and Capt. Rodolfo ?Fuego? Orozco from RAF Lakenheath, England, stand in front of their F-15C Eagle fighter jet and offer passers-by posters, patches and T-shirts for a donation for charity at the Royal International Air Tattoo at RAF Fairford, England, on Saturday. Leong and Orozco are both assigned to the 494th Fighter Squadron. (David Hodge/Stars and Stripes)
U.S. Air Force pilots Capt. Kalae ?Inch? Leong, right, and Capt. Rodolfo ?Fuego? Orozco from RAF Lakenheath, England, stand in front of their F-15C Eagle fighter jet and offer passers-by posters, patches and T-shirts for a donation for charity at the Royal International Air Tattoo at RAF Fairford, England, on Saturday. Leong and Orozco are both assigned to the 494th Fighter Squadron.
U.S. Air Force pilots Capt. Kalae ?Inch? Leong, right, and Capt. Rodolfo ?Fuego? Orozco from RAF Lakenheath, England, stand in front of their F-15C Eagle fighter jet and offer passers-by posters, patches and T-shirts for a donation for charity at the Royal International Air Tattoo at RAF Fairford, England, on Saturday. Leong and Orozco are both assigned to the 494th Fighter Squadron. (David Hodge/Stars and Stripes)
A formation of F-5E Tiger II aircraft fly overhead of spectators at the Royal International Air Tattoo at RAF Fairford, England, on Saturday. This year, the RIATs 25th anniversary at the British air base, nearly 300 aircraft of all kinds were on display in the air or on the ground. The F-5E Tiger II aircraft belong to the Swiss air force.
A formation of F-5E Tiger II aircraft fly overhead of spectators at the Royal International Air Tattoo at RAF Fairford, England, on Saturday. This year, the RIATs 25th anniversary at the British air base, nearly 300 aircraft of all kinds were on display in the air or on the ground. The F-5E Tiger II aircraft belong to the Swiss air force. (Stars and Stripes)
Disabled pilots from the Italian We Fly team maneuver their Texan 550 LSA aircraft over the tens of thousands of spectators in attendance at the 25th annual Royal International Air Tattoo at RAF Fairford, England. The light-sport aircraft are designed to be easy to fly.
Disabled pilots from the Italian We Fly team maneuver their Texan 550 LSA aircraft over the tens of thousands of spectators in attendance at the 25th annual Royal International Air Tattoo at RAF Fairford, England. The light-sport aircraft are designed to be easy to fly. (David Hodge/Stars and Stripes)
A Royal Air Force Chinook HC2 prepares for landing as spectators at the Royal International Air Tattoo enjoy an eight-hour flying display. In its 25th year at RAF Fairford, England, this two-day spectacle was expected to bring in an estimated 155,000 people over the weekend.
A Royal Air Force Chinook HC2 prepares for landing as spectators at the Royal International Air Tattoo enjoy an eight-hour flying display. In its 25th year at RAF Fairford, England, this two-day spectacle was expected to bring in an estimated 155,000 people over the weekend. (David Hodge/Stars and Stripes)
A row of F-16AM Fighting Falcons from the Royal Netherlands Air Force are on display at the Royal International Air Tattoo at RAF Fairford, England. An estimated 155,000 people will visit the air show over the weekend where about 300 aircraft are on display either in the air or on the ground.  

David Hodge/Stars and Stripes
A row of F-16AM Fighting Falcons from the Royal Netherlands Air Force are on display at the Royal International Air Tattoo at RAF Fairford, England. An estimated 155,000 people will visit the air show over the weekend where about 300 aircraft are on display either in the air or on the ground. David Hodge/Stars and Stripes (David Hodge/Stars and Stripes)
A few members of the British Air Training Corps have their picture snapped in front of a B-52H Stratofortress from Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier City, La.
A few members of the British Air Training Corps have their picture snapped in front of a B-52H Stratofortress from Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier City, La. (David Hodge/Stars and Stripes)

Some 300 aircraft are on display on the ground and in the air during this weekend’s Royal International Air Tattoo, being held for the 25th year at RAF Fairford, England.

The show, which claims to be the largest military aircraft display in the world, is expected to draw between 155,000 and 160,000 spectators to see aircraft from the United States, Britain and a dozen other European countries as well as Jordan, New Zealand and Oman.

There are also special exhibits dedicated to this year’s theme, the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Britain. Saturday morning’s cloudy and windy conditions did not cancel any flights, although air show officials said some of the air formations were kept a little farther apart as a precaution.

The show continues Sunday with gates opening at 7:30 a.m. and flights between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Anyone who does not have a ticket, however, will have to watch from outside the gate, as no tickets are being sold on the day of the show.

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