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OSAN AIR BASE, South Korea — At a busy fighter base like this one, it’s not uncommon to halt a conversation until the roar of a jet taking off dies down.

That won’t be necessary from now until early June. Osan’s 9,000-foot runway closed Thursday for routine spot repairs and won’t reopen until June 5.

Osan-based aircraft and aircrews have moved to other bases in South Korea until the $3 million project is finished, said 1st Lt. Kevin Coffman, a spokesman for Osan’s 51st Fighter Wing.

Some aircraft mechanics also have been moved and others will commute daily “depending on the circumstances,” Coffman said.

Base officials declined to say where aircraft and personnel have moved, citing security reasons.

Osan’s aircraft include F-16 fighters, A-10 attack planes, the U-2 reconnaissance plane, the C-12 passenger plane and combat search-and-rescue helicopters.

Workers will repair or replace concrete slabs that have cracked or weakened, officials said. They’ll also repair spalls — pothole-like depressions in the concrete.

“It creates a smooth surface for the plane to roll over,” said 1st Lt. Charles Comfort, project manager with Osan’s 51st Civil Engineer Squadron. “If you have too many bumps the planes don’t take off or land very well.”

Where necessary, they’ll also put fresh sealant between concrete slabs, he said.

New asphalt will be poured on shoulders of the taxiways and at a taxi lane at the runway’s west end, and airfield markings will be repainted.

“Those marking are very difficult to see if they’re not properly marked,” Comfort said. “And we’re going to ensure that once we get a nice surface for them to roll on, pilots can know exactly where they are.”

Various buildings will also get a new coat of paint. Drains will be fixed, the grass cut and weeds sprayed.

Much of the work will be done by the Il Kwang Industrial Corp. Ltd., under an Army contract. The rest will be done by airmen.

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