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Officers of Korean National Police assigned to Nam-bu station in Taegu, South Korea, sort just some of the 136 pies and other baked goods dropped off at their headquarters by the U.S. Army to thank the cops for round-the-clock guard duty they pull outside three installations in Taegu, Camps Henry, Walker, and George.
Officers of Korean National Police assigned to Nam-bu station in Taegu, South Korea, sort just some of the 136 pies and other baked goods dropped off at their headquarters by the U.S. Army to thank the cops for round-the-clock guard duty they pull outside three installations in Taegu, Camps Henry, Walker, and George. (Courtesy of U.S. Army)
Officers of Korean National Police assigned to Nam-bu station in Taegu, South Korea, sort just some of the 136 pies and other baked goods dropped off at their headquarters by the U.S. Army to thank the cops for round-the-clock guard duty they pull outside three installations in Taegu, Camps Henry, Walker, and George.
Officers of Korean National Police assigned to Nam-bu station in Taegu, South Korea, sort just some of the 136 pies and other baked goods dropped off at their headquarters by the U.S. Army to thank the cops for round-the-clock guard duty they pull outside three installations in Taegu, Camps Henry, Walker, and George. (Courtesy of U.S. Army)
Police Chief Lee Kwang-young of the Korean National Police receives one of the 136 pies dropped off at Nambu police station in Taegu, South Korea by soldiers from U.S. Army installations in the city. Presenting Lee the pie is Army Maj. Gen. Jeanette K. Edmunds, commander of the 19th Theater Support Command at nearby Camp Henry. Edmunds, herself, baked several pies.
Police Chief Lee Kwang-young of the Korean National Police receives one of the 136 pies dropped off at Nambu police station in Taegu, South Korea by soldiers from U.S. Army installations in the city. Presenting Lee the pie is Army Maj. Gen. Jeanette K. Edmunds, commander of the 19th Theater Support Command at nearby Camp Henry. Edmunds, herself, baked several pies. (Courtesy of U.S. Army)

TAEGU, South Korea — Army Sgt. Maj. Rozenia Carter knows that at all hours and in good or bad weather, her installation will be guarded by young, blue-clad Korean National Police officers.

And like many other U.S. servicemembers, she appreciates them.

“You know, long hours, I mean it … out there when it’s raining, out there when it’s cold, out there when it’s hot, out there guarding the gates to protect our military people,” Carter said.

So no one needed to ask twice when she learned her unit, the 19th Theater Support Command at Camp Henry, wanted to thank the cops by baking them some pies. The Army code-named the undertaking Operation Apple Pie and gave itself about 72 hours to come up with 100 pies. D-Day was Dec. 30.

The plan called for trucking the pies to the Nam-bu police station in south Taegu’s Nam-gu district. The unit’s leadership got the word around: We want to thank the Korean National Police, or KNPs, and need people to donate pies, homemade or store-bought.

Those with the know-how got out their pie pans and mixing bowls and started rolling dough and sprinkling flour.

Maj. Gen. Jeanette K. Edmunds, the 19th TSC’s commander, baked two pies from scratch. Other donors hit the stores and bought frozen pies, which still needed baking.

Carter works in the G-3 section, where a major was given money to buy pies on the section’s behalf.

“He brought three of the pies to me at church on that Sunday and I put ’em in the freezer until church was over, and later on that night, I put ’em in the oven and I began to bake ’em,” Carter said.

Still others bought or baked cookies and cupcakes.

The headquarters conference room served as the staging area and was filled of the aroma of 136 pies — apple, pecan, pumpkin, cherry and more — plus cupcakes, cookies and other baked goods.

“Oh gosh, it was a lot,” said Carter. “I tell you what, it looked delicious.

“Oh gosh, pies were smelling good,” she added, laughing. “I had to fight myself off from eating them.”

The South Korean police appeared most pleased.

“There were a few young police officers there, and they were all smiles,” said Maj. Andrew Mutter, 19th TSC spokesman.

“They were looking over the baked goods, and you could see them wanting to take a nibble. So it was a very pleasant atmosphere, and we were very warmly received.”

“The pies,” Carter said, “represent that we really care about them, to show them our appreciation for what they have done for the American soldiers and for our community. It’s a gesture of love.”

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