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Movie producer Samuel Goldwyn, on a tour of Europe, meets with reporters at Frankfurt in July, 1953.

Movie producer Samuel Goldwyn, on a tour of Europe, meets with reporters at Frankfurt in July, 1953. (Ted Rohde/Stars and Stripes)

Movie producer Samuel Goldwyn, on a tour of Europe, meets with reporters at Frankfurt in July, 1953.

Movie producer Samuel Goldwyn, on a tour of Europe, meets with reporters at Frankfurt in July, 1953. (Ted Rohde/Stars and Stripes)

Movie producer Samuel Goldwyn, on a tour of Europe, meets with reporters at Frankfurt in July, 1953.

Movie producer Samuel Goldwyn, on a tour of Europe, meets with reporters at Frankfurt in July, 1953. (Ted Rohde/Stars and Stripes)

FRANKFURT, July 23 — Movie producer Samuel Goldwyn indicated here yesterday the public is kidding itself and said flatly there's no such thing as 3-D movies.

"You put on glasses and think you're seeing a full-blown person," said the fit-looking 69-year-old movie magnate who is on a four-month tour of Europe. He hastened to add, however, that he believes in another year there will be a screen which will portray a dimensional quality without necessitating the use of glasses.

The final arbiter in the matter of movies of the future will be the public, he said. The average person will decide whether it will be 3-D, CinemaScope or one of the two-or-three other innovations coming along.

Goldwyn, who rose from immigrant Polish status to become one of Hollywood's most famous names, said he personally would not make a 3-D film. He'd look at but wouldn't make one, he said.

The influence of television has been, and will continue to be, the making of finer films, Goldwyn said. The film producer, who is accompanied by his wife, was feted by Frankfurt political figures today.

"Since TV came in, we have found that people stay home and look at the bad pictures," he said. "The public will turn out only to fine pictures."

Goldwyn described the story as the important thing in movie production.

"A fine actor or a fine director will do a better job with a fine story," he said. "And a good story will carry the actor or director, but no one can carry a poor story."

Goldwyn, who will go on to France, Belgium and the Scandinavian countries, was scheduled to leave for Paris late today.


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