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YOKOSUKA NAVAL BASE, Japan — The wife of a USS Kitty Hawk sailor is in Japanese custody after police say she abused her infant son because he wouldn’t stop crying.

Natasha Yvette Anderson, 20, was arrested Thursday after police say she threw her 2-month- old son on a bed at her Yokosuka city home in early October. The baby suffered a brain hemorrhage and broken chest bone, an Uraga police official said Friday.

Although he did not know the baby’s current condition, the police official said there was no threat to the child’s life. The official said the baby was taken to a Japanese hospital in Isehara for tests.

According to police, Anderson admitted abusing her son and said she did it because he would not stop crying.

Her case was to be sent to the Yokohama District Public Prosecutor’s Office in Yokosuka on Saturday, police said.

Anderson first took the baby to U.S. Naval Hospital Yokosuka in October, but because the incident happened off base, the case was turned over to Japanese police, the official said.

Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Japan spokesman Jon Nylander confirmed that the Navy is aware of the case and said they are cooperating with the Japanese authorities in the investigation.

“The Japanese are exercising primary jurisdiction,” Nylander said.

Anderson is married to a 20-year-old USS Kitty Hawk sailor. The forward-deployed aircraft carrier has been under way in the Pacific since October. There was no word on whether the sailor was returned home to take care of the child.

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Hana Kusumoto is a reporter/translator who has been covering local authorities in Japan since 2002. She was born in Nagoya, Japan, and lived in Australia and Illinois growing up. She holds a journalism degree from Boston University and previously worked for the Christian Science Monitor’s Tokyo bureau.

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