Support our mission
 

A metal cylinder Japanese police believe was a projectile launched in Monday’s explosions was found on Camp Zama, according to a Zama city police spokesman.

Japanese officers made the discovery about 3 p.m. Thursday during a search of the base, he said. The object is being analyzed to see if it was launched from two metal pipes found earlier this week.

Maj. Martha Brooks, a U.S. Army Japan spokeswoman, confirmed the find but said there were no damages to the installation.

“While the motive is still unknown, we do know the Camp Zama military police, along with the city and Kanagawa Prefecture police, have done an outstanding job working together to see if there was or still is a threat to the community,” she said Thursday night. “We’re just happy to report there were no injuries.”

The metal tube found is about 14 inches long and 2 inches in diameter at the widest part, the police spokesman said. Investigators found it on a grassy area roughly 215 yards southeast of the U.S. Army Japan headquarters building.

“It was in the back area by the gate that’s not used,” Brooks said. “It was not that close to USARJ.”

Based on its size, police believe the object was launched from one of the two metal pipes found at Yatoyama Park, less than a mile southeast of Camp Zama, the police spokesman said.

Similar pipes were found at the same park in November 2002, when two projectiles were located, including one on the roof of a home outside the base.

No one has claimed responsibility or offered any possible motive for Monday’s incident, which occurred just after 11 p.m. Authorities continue to investigate.

“We’re just trying to make sure the community is safe,” Brooks said. “We can all take comfort in how quickly and effectively our military police responded to the report and how well our local police are conducting the investigation.”

Migrated
twitter Email

Stripes in 7



around the web


Sign Up for Daily Headlines

Sign-up to receive a daily email of today’s top military news stories from Stars and Stripes and top news outlets from around the world.

Sign up