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Military working dog stamps are coming to a post office near you

The U.S. Postal Service will issue 2019 stamps featuring military working dogs.

U.S. POSTAL SERVICE

By STARS AND STRIPES Published: January 31, 2019

The U.S. Postal Service will recognize the furriest members of the military with stamps this year.

There will be one stamp each for the German shepherd, Labrador retriever, Belgian Malinois and Dutch shepherd breeds, which are all types of military working dogs.

Other stamps coming to post offices near you include a red-white-and-blue design called Star Ribbon, as well as tributes to tennis champion Maureen Connolly Brinker, artist Ellsworth Kelly and the transcontinental railroad.

More details on this year's stamps, such as release dates and locations for the first-day-of-issue ceremonies, will be released soon, according to a Tuesday USPS statement.

In honor of military working dogs, here are five stories that offer glimpses into their lives from the past year:

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Army Ranger dog who died in Afghanistan saved soldiers’ lives

A U.S. military working dog named Maiko was killed during a November clash in Afghanistan in which an American soldier also died. The 7-year-old dog was leading Rangers into a compound when at least one militant fired at him, revealing the militant’s position, which the Rangers then targeted, according to a biography of the dog.

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Vigilance: Dog teams work to keep America’s largest Pacific air base safe

Stars and Stripes visited with Senior Airman James Burger, a military working dog handler, and a 13-year-old German shepherd named Judi while they were on guard at the Pacific’s largest U.S. air base.

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'He's dreamt about this forever': Marine veteran and his working dog to reunite after seven years apart

Marine Nick Montez had to say goodbye to his working dog after returning from a deployment in Afghanistan. He spent years working toward adopting Mally, a 9-year-old yellow Labrador retriever.

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Sailor wins again at Japan’s grueling Iron Dog competition, which Navy says is like CrossFit for handlers and canines

A Yokosuka master-at-arms won U.S. Forces Japan’s Iron Dog competition for the second year in a row. “I was just so happy with him,” said Petty Officer 1st Class Ashly Lester of her dog, Ttibor.

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Air Force veteran tearfully reunites with military dog after years apart

Adam Wylie had tears in his eyes when he greeted the new addition to his family, a military working dog he spent two years with at Osan Air Base in South Korea. Emra may have been a little more gray around the muzzle, but when they were reunited, the pair picked up right where they left off.
 

Along with Sgt. Leandro A.S. Jasso, multi-purpose canine Maiko was killed in action on Nov. 24, 2018, in Afghanistan.

Senior Airman James Burger of the 18th Security Forces Squadron plays with his military working dog before training to search for explosives at Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Nov. 20, 2018.
CARLOS VAZQUEZ/STARS AND STRIPES

Lance Cpl. Nick Montez, an improvised explosive device dog handler with Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, calms his working dog, Mally, during pre-deployment training at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif., Sept. 26, 2011.
U.S. MARINES

Petty Officer 1st Class Ashly Lester and her dog, Ttibor, won a competition over 17 other working-dog teams from across all services in the U.S. military and the Japan Self-Defense Forces in Tokyo.
JUAN TORRES/U.S. AIR FORCE

Retired military dog Emra was brought home to the United States from Korea, where she had been serving, and delivered into the arms of her former handler, Adam Wylie.
AMERICAN HUMANE

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