Support our mission
Eugene Scott, a 78-year-old retired Air Force staff sergeant whose life was saved by the efforts of his neighbors.

Eugene Scott, a 78-year-old retired Air Force staff sergeant whose life was saved by the efforts of his neighbors. (Steve Mraz / S&S)

Eugene Scott, a 78-year-old retired Air Force staff sergeant whose life was saved by the efforts of his neighbors.

Eugene Scott, a 78-year-old retired Air Force staff sergeant whose life was saved by the efforts of his neighbors. (Steve Mraz / S&S)

Army 1st Lt. Karla Clarke, left, and husband Dick saved Scott's life when he suffered a heart attack.

Army 1st Lt. Karla Clarke, left, and husband Dick saved Scott's life when he suffered a heart attack. (Steve Mraz / S&S)

KINDSBACH, Germany — Karla Clarke doesn’t mind being awakened by her neighbor’s singing while trying to sleep after working the night shift.

That’s because the first lieutenant, with the 212th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, and her husband, Dick Clarke, a retired Special Forces medic, are responsible for saving their Kindsbach neighbor’s life.

On the morning of March 22, the couple administered cardiopulmonary resuscitation to retired Air Force Staff Sgt. Eugene Scott, thus preventing the 78-year-old Scott from dying of a heart attack.

“Even when I’m working nights and sleeping during the day, when I hear him sing I smile,” Karla Clarke said.

U.S. Army and Kindsbach city officials recently recognized the Clarkes for their efforts during a ceremony at the Landstuhl Rathaus. The Clarkes received a bouquet of flowers and a certificate of appreciation from Kindsbach Mayor Matthias Donauer. Karla Clarke, who also works at the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, was presented with an Army Achievement Medal.

The life-saving event unfolded around 9:15 a.m. on March 22. The Clarkes live above the Scotts in a multifamily dwelling in Kindsbach, between Kaiserslautern and Landstuhl.

Scott had just returned from his usual bicycle trip to a nearby bakery. Karla Clarke had decided to stop by home before an 11 a.m. appointment. She was reading the paper when Scott’s wife, Gertrud, came to the Clarkes’ door and told the couple she thought her husband was having a stroke.

They ran downstairs.

“It was so weird because he was sitting in his chair, and he was real pasty,” Karla Clarke said. “He brought his arm up. I felt his pulse. I felt it, and then it stopped.”

Karla Clarke moved Eugene Scott to the floor. Dick Clarke told Gertrud Scott, a Kindsbach native, to call for a German ambulance.

The Clarkes then began CPR, with Karla Clarke performing the breathing and Dick doing the chest compressions.

They kept up the CPR for two minutes before Scott gasped.

“It sort of startled us both,” Dick Clarke said. “I thought he was out.”

Eugene Scott regained consciousness but then started to fade. The Clarkes then rubbed their knuckles across his sternum to keep him awake.

“I was so happy they were here,” Gertrud Scott said. “I wouldn’t have known what to do.”

An ambulance arrived shortly thereafter and attended to him.

“The rescuers looked up and said, ‘You realize you just saved this guy’s life,’” Dick Clarke said. “When the doctor came, got the story and started working on him; she said the same thing.”

Nearly three months after the incident, Eugene Scott is back home and able to get around the back yard. Scott’s near-death experience and ensuing quadruple bypass surgery haven’t prevented him from belting out his favorite big-band songs from the 1940s.

“I don’t go for that Snoopy Snoopy Dog crap,” he said.

The experience obviously has not affected Scott’s sense of humor.


Stripes in 7



around the web


Sign Up for Daily Headlines

Sign-up to receive a daily email of today’s top military news stories from Stars and Stripes and top news outlets from around the world.

Sign up