Subscribe
A pair of HH-60H Seahawks of Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron 2, the “Golden Falcons,” land aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln at the day’s completion of flight operations. The Lincoln, currently under way in the western Pacific, recently received Indonesian officials when passing by that nation after training in Singapore.

A pair of HH-60H Seahawks of Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron 2, the “Golden Falcons,” land aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln at the day’s completion of flight operations. The Lincoln, currently under way in the western Pacific, recently received Indonesian officials when passing by that nation after training in Singapore. (James R. Evans / Courtesy of U.S. Navy)

A pair of HH-60H Seahawks of Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron 2, the “Golden Falcons,” land aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln at the day’s completion of flight operations. The Lincoln, currently under way in the western Pacific, recently received Indonesian officials when passing by that nation after training in Singapore.

A pair of HH-60H Seahawks of Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron 2, the “Golden Falcons,” land aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln at the day’s completion of flight operations. The Lincoln, currently under way in the western Pacific, recently received Indonesian officials when passing by that nation after training in Singapore. (James R. Evans / Courtesy of U.S. Navy)

Aviation ordnancemen attach cargo pendants to the underside of an MH-60 Knighthawk during a vertical replenishment between the Abraham Lincoln and the Naval Fleet Auxilliary Force Ammunition Ship USNS Kiska.

Aviation ordnancemen attach cargo pendants to the underside of an MH-60 Knighthawk during a vertical replenishment between the Abraham Lincoln and the Naval Fleet Auxilliary Force Ammunition Ship USNS Kiska. (James R. Evans / Courtesy of U.S. Navy)

Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit aailors discuss diving techniques with a Singaporean EOD chief warrant officer outside of a WWII-era British hyperbaric chamber.

Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit aailors discuss diving techniques with a Singaporean EOD chief warrant officer outside of a WWII-era British hyperbaric chamber. (Jeremie Yoder / Courtesy of U.S. Navy)

Fifteen months after delivering tons of food and water to tsunami-ravaged Indonesia, the USS Abraham Lincoln passed the island nation on its way through the Pacific last week.

U.S. Ambassador B. Lynn Pascoe and several Indonesian leaders flew aboard for a visit, according to the ship’s public affairs office.

Pascoe thanked the sailors who served during the January 2005 tsunami relief effort.

“It was everybody being involved, from people flying the helicopters to people filling water bottles to people on shore carrying sacks of rice,” he said. “It was just an incredible operation from the very first.”

The ship, and its strike group, was in Singapore for a port visit and bilateral training last week and before that, stopped in Thailand. The strike group is deployed to the region for six months to support maritime security, Navy officials said.

The Everett, Wash.-based aircraft carrier has been on a routine deployment to the region since February.

Sign Up for Daily Headlines

Sign-up to receive a daily email of today’s top military news stories from Stars and Stripes and top news outlets from around the world.

Sign up