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A soldier wounded in Iraq is carried on a stretcher off a U.S. Air Force C-141 at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, on Monday. Twelve servicemembers injured in the war in Iraq were flown to Ramstein and then transferred to the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center for treatment.

A soldier wounded in Iraq is carried on a stretcher off a U.S. Air Force C-141 at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, on Monday. Twelve servicemembers injured in the war in Iraq were flown to Ramstein and then transferred to the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center for treatment. (Raymond T. Conway / S&S)

A soldier wounded in Iraq is carried on a stretcher off a U.S. Air Force C-141 at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, on Monday. Twelve servicemembers injured in the war in Iraq were flown to Ramstein and then transferred to the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center for treatment.

A soldier wounded in Iraq is carried on a stretcher off a U.S. Air Force C-141 at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, on Monday. Twelve servicemembers injured in the war in Iraq were flown to Ramstein and then transferred to the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center for treatment. (Raymond T. Conway / S&S)

Tech. Sgt. John Schiffhauer, 932nd Aero Medical Evacuation Squadron, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, along with members from the 86th Aero Medical Staging Facility, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, unload wounded from a C-141 at Ramstein Air Base, Germany.

Tech. Sgt. John Schiffhauer, 932nd Aero Medical Evacuation Squadron, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, along with members from the 86th Aero Medical Staging Facility, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, unload wounded from a C-141 at Ramstein Air Base, Germany. (Courtesy of USAF)

Capt. Adelver Martin, a certified registered nurse with the 86th Aeromedical Staging Facility, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, checks on wounded patients prior to transporting them from Ramstein Air Base, Germany, to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center.

Capt. Adelver Martin, a certified registered nurse with the 86th Aeromedical Staging Facility, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, checks on wounded patients prior to transporting them from Ramstein Air Base, Germany, to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center. (Courtesy of USAF)

LANDSTUHL, Germany — Medical personnel at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center are treating the first group of patients to arrive here with wounds received during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Twelve patients were flown into Ramstein Air Base from Kuwait on Monday morning on a C-141 cargo plane and were transferred by ambulance to the hospital, the Army’s largest in Europe.

Of those 12, eight — six Marines and two soldiers — had combat-related wounds, according to Marie Shaw, hospital spokeswoman.

Hospital officials would not reveal units of any of the wounded, but did say all the injuries did not occur in one place.

Most of the wounded had blast-related injuries, including at least one that was apparently caused by a rocket-launched grenade, hospital officials said during a briefing Monday afternoon.

Col. David Rubenstein, hospital commander, said doctors have not yet talked to the patients about details.

“We have not gotten to the point of asking what happened and where it happened — the things patients like to talk about,” he said.

He also said some of the wounded had undergone surgery downrange before being evacuated to Ramstein.

Two of the wounded were in intensive care. The rest were placed in the medical surgery ward, said Maj. Yong Chun, a Landstuhl physician.

The wounded were initially greeted by chaplains as well as medical personnel.

“Their moods were positive, at least the ones we were able to talk to,” said Army Lt. Col. Glenn Woodsman, one of the chaplains.

First Lt. Christine Gerba, a nurse, said that the first thing that some of the more stable patients wanted to do was to contact their families.

She said one in particular really wanted to call his parents.

In addition to these 12 patients, two Marines wounded in battle were brought to Landstuhl on Sunday.

Hospital officials also said the first members of the 101st Airborne Division wounded in Kuwait when a fellow soldier tossed a grenade into a tent complex are expected at the hospital Tuesday.

In recent weeks, the hospital has doubled the number of its beds to 300 in anticipation of treating soldiers injured in the fighting in Iraq.

Roughly 600 Air National Guard troops joined the hospital’s staff of 1,000 to deal with the anticipated patient flow.

Since October 2001, Landstuhl has treated about 2,000 patients injured during Operation Enduring Freedom and the fighting in Iraq.

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