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Lakenheath senior Jonathan Panchal purchases a pastry from junior Tricia Hoyt during the school's fourth annual World's Biggest Coffee Morning, a U.K.-wide event to raise money for the fight against cancer.

Lakenheath senior Jonathan Panchal purchases a pastry from junior Tricia Hoyt during the school's fourth annual World's Biggest Coffee Morning, a U.K.-wide event to raise money for the fight against cancer. (Sean Kimmons / S&S)

Lakenheath senior Jonathan Panchal purchases a pastry from junior Tricia Hoyt during the school's fourth annual World's Biggest Coffee Morning, a U.K.-wide event to raise money for the fight against cancer.

Lakenheath senior Jonathan Panchal purchases a pastry from junior Tricia Hoyt during the school's fourth annual World's Biggest Coffee Morning, a U.K.-wide event to raise money for the fight against cancer. (Sean Kimmons / S&S)

Lakenheath High School freshman Pierre Stoddard grabs a few doughnuts during the World's Biggest Coffee Morning.

Lakenheath High School freshman Pierre Stoddard grabs a few doughnuts during the World's Biggest Coffee Morning. (Sean Kimmons / S&S)

RAF LAKENHEATH — Lakenheath High School took a charitable step forward Friday as it hosted its fourth annual World’s Biggest Coffee Morning, a U.K.-wide event to raise money for the fight against cancer.

The event is essentially a doughnut and coffee social, with donations going to Macmillan Cancer Support, a British group that acts as a support network for those affected by cancer.

The World’s Biggest Coffee event is one of the biggest fundraising efforts in the U.K., with an estimated 2 million people taking part last year, according to www.macmillan.org.uk, the Macmillan Web site.

The 1½-hour event at Lakenheath raked in roughly 250 pounds, teacher Caletha Mitchell said. Last year, the Lakenheath staff raised more than 150 pounds for the charity, said Dawn Bangs, a teacher and an event organizer.

For the first time Friday morning, students took part.

“A lot of them are excited because they’ll actually be having coffee,” Bangs said.

On Friday morning, the student council led the student part of the effort, offering coffee, sweets and hot chocolate in exchange for donations to the fund.

It’s a way to help people, Lakenheath senior and student council member Lance Hurst said.

“The teachers have always done it,” he said. “We figured it’d be great if we joined in.”

The edible remains from the event will be given to the National Honor Society, which will use them in an upcoming fundraiser, Hurst said.

“I just think it’s fun, and it’s an opportunity to serve,” he said. “We just want to help people.”

Many of those involved in the event can identify with the charity’s efforts, Bangs said.

“A lot of people have been touched by cancer somehow,” she said. “It’s a big British event.”

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