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The Sullivans School Network crew takes over Yokosuka Naval Base’s television broadcasting studio Friday for their own version of “Yokosuka Reports.”

The Sullivans School Network crew takes over Yokosuka Naval Base’s television broadcasting studio Friday for their own version of “Yokosuka Reports.” (Allison Batdorff / S&S)

YOKOSUKA NAVAL BASE, Japan — It was a takeover, but it was hardly hostile. The Sullivans School students had simply heard enough about the wonders of drywall.

With “boring!” as their battle cry, the students pushed aside “Yokosuka Report” anchorman Tim Shannon and took over the Yokosuka base’s newsroom.

The coup was all in fun — a planned rebellion to give 15 students a chance to hone their broadcasting skills in a high-tech working studio.

The kids are old hands in front of and behind the camera; they shoot their own 10-minute show every morning called “Sullivans School News,” or SSN. The show has been running since Information Specialist Barbara Bowman started it four years ago.

“We have different students say the Pledge of Allegiance, perform patriotic songs and do announcements about the school and clubs. Students also interview special guests who come to visit us,” Bowman said.

Every Sullivans student — there are 1,200 of them — is on television at least once a year, Bowman said.

The Sullivans Network Crew brought a slew of questions with them Friday, ranging from “What do you do when the president of the United States comes to visit?” to “What happens when you make a mistake on camera?”

“We don’t go live, so we keep what makes us look good and edit out the rest … and we usually delete a lot,” Shannon kidded in answer to the latter.

The students learned about green-screen technology, how to tell the difference between a unidirectional and omnidirectional microphone and cracked the code of “OTS,” the over-the-shoulder shot.

Even so, reading the news at a normal pace while not squinting at the teleprompter or perspiring under the bright lights is harder than it looks, said 11-year-old Dominique Jordan.

“I was nervous at first,” Dominique said after her time in the anchor’s chair. “But then I realized that this was for fun, not competition or something.”

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