Support our mission
In this sketch by courtroom artist Brigitte Woosley, Air Force Lt. Col. Edward Mazuchowski testifies Aug. 14, 2013, in the ongoing trial of Maj. Nidal Hasan. Mazuchowski is a forensic pathologist who performed autopsies on two of the victims of the Nov. 5, 2009 shooting at Ft. Hood.

In this sketch by courtroom artist Brigitte Woosley, Air Force Lt. Col. Edward Mazuchowski testifies Aug. 14, 2013, in the ongoing trial of Maj. Nidal Hasan. Mazuchowski is a forensic pathologist who performed autopsies on two of the victims of the Nov. 5, 2009 shooting at Ft. Hood. (Stars and Stripes)

FORT HOOD, Texas — Prosecutors in the trial of Maj. Nidal Hasan cannot use or even read documents from a 2010 sanity board that Hasan released to the media, the judge ruled Wednesday.

The documents showed that Hasan told mental health experts he “would still be a martyr” if he died by lethal injection.

Earlier this week, Hasan released through his civilian laywer a report from the board to the New York Times. In the report, he tells members of the board that he didn’t think what he did was wrong “because it was for the greater cause of helping my Muslim brothers.”

Read more on Maj. Nidal Hasan and the Fort Hood shootings

Hasan is accused of killing 13 people and injuring 32 others on Nov. 5, 2009. He was shot by police after the massacre in a Fort Hood clinic and is paralyzed from the waist down. He is taken into the courtroom each day in a wheelchair.

Wednesday, Navy Capt. Edward Reedy told the court that all the autopsies of the shooting victims were done at Dover Air Force Base, and he performed two of them. One of the autopsies he performed was that of Michael Cahill, a retired soldier and the only person wearing civilian clothes who was killed that day.

Reedy said Cahill had six gunshot wounds, including one on the left side of the back of his neck that had happened while he was still alive.

Several witnesses previously testified that Cahill was shot when he charged Hasan with a chair in an effort to stop the attack.

Reedy also performed an autopsy on Pfc. Kham S. Xiong. A witness who had called Xiong his “battle buddy” said the young man was looking at photos of his children on his phone just before the shooting began.

Xiong was shot three times, Reedy said: twice in the head, and once in the thigh.

Two other forensic pathologists also testified Wednesday, detailing gunshot wounds that ripped through internal organs from all directions, including some that seemed to suggest the victims were lying on the floor when hit.

Air Force Lt. Col. Edward Mazuchowski II and Air Force Maj. Terrill Tops said the two victims each they examined all died of the multiple gunshot wounds they received.

hlad.jennifer@stripes.com Twitter: @jhlad


Stripes in 7



around the web


Sign Up for Daily Headlines

Sign-up to receive a daily email of today’s top military news stories from Stars and Stripes and top news outlets from around the world.

Sign up