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Afloat Training Group Western Pacific’s Petty Officer 1st Class Jonathan Edmiston, a combat systems instructor and amateur escape artist, wriggles out of a straitjacket on July 4 at Yokosuka Naval Base, Japan. Edmiston recently received word that the “Guinness World Records” book had accepted his claim of breaking the standing world record for fastest straitjacket escape with his time of 20.72 seconds. The previous record was 50.08 seconds.
Afloat Training Group Western Pacific’s Petty Officer 1st Class Jonathan Edmiston, a combat systems instructor and amateur escape artist, wriggles out of a straitjacket on July 4 at Yokosuka Naval Base, Japan. Edmiston recently received word that the “Guinness World Records” book had accepted his claim of breaking the standing world record for fastest straitjacket escape with his time of 20.72 seconds. The previous record was 50.08 seconds. (Courtesy of U.S. Navy)

Pacific edition, Wednesday, August 15, 2007

YOKOSUKA NAVAL BASE, Japan — Some children thumb through the Guinness World Records pages hoping that one day they will see their own names in print.

For most, this dream takes a back seat to other pursuits. But not for Petty Officer 1st Class Jonathan Edmiston.

Edmiston, with Afloat Training Group, Western Pacific, soon will see his childhood dream come true after he became the world’s fastest straitjacket escape artist July 4 at Yokosuka Naval Base’s Independence Day celebration.

Performing as “Danger Nate,” Edmiston, dressed in star-spangled tights and a straitjacket, obliterated the previous world record by escaping the binding in a mere 20.72 seconds. The previous record was 50.08 seconds.

To make the feat one for the record books Edmiston submitted a comprehensive package to Guinness, including signed statements, photographs and video of the attempt.

“The results are in from Guinness World Records,” Edmiston wrote in an e-mail to Stars and Stripes. “I officially hold the new record for ‘Fastest Straitjacket Escape.’”

Edmiston said he was ecstatic when he found out last week he had set the record.

“I found out around midnight, and I spent the rest of the night calling everyone I knew back in the States,” he said.

But Danger Nate still has some work ahead of him.

“Now that I have that record, I am thinking about going for two more — the fastest straitjacket escape upside down and the fastest escape underwater,” he said.

Another feat he’s having to perform is one of patience.

The 2008 Guinness edition has already been published, and Edmiston is keeping his fingers crossed that no one will beat his record before the 2009 book goes to press.

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