Support our mission
An aerial photograph from April 2008 shows Camp Humphreys in South Korea and part of the new land onto which the post will expand by 2012. The post is getting ready for a four-year, $450 million upgrade to its power grid, water lines and other key utilities.

An aerial photograph from April 2008 shows Camp Humphreys in South Korea and part of the new land onto which the post will expand by 2012. The post is getting ready for a four-year, $450 million upgrade to its power grid, water lines and other key utilities. (Bob McElroy / Courtesy of the U.S. Army)

PYEONGTAEK, South Korea — Camp Humphreys is readying for a four-year upgrade to its power grid, water lines and other key utilities.

Officials say the $450 million project is crucial to transforming the base into the U.S. military’s flagship installation in South Korea.

Humphreys, in Pyeongtaek, is slated to triple in size in coming years and see the bulk of U.S. forces on the peninsula eventually stationed there.

"During this time we’re going to be tearing up roads and demolishing buildings," Brian Peckins, acting public works director for the U.S. Army Garrison-Humphreys, said Friday. "In the near term there will be lots of road closures and water outages and power outages."

The Humphreys expansion plan calls for 600 new structures to be built, and the post’s population is expected to dramatically increase, he said. The total expansion will cost an estimated $13 billion.

"As we’re transforming from a single-soldier post to a tour-normalized, family-friendly community, we’ve got to replace the antiquated infrastructure to support the thousands of additional people that’ll be coming to Humphreys along with this transformation," Peckins said.

"If we didn’t have the electrical upgrade and the water upgrade, the garrison would exceed its capacity," he said.

Portions of the post’s electrical power distribution system will be upgraded. New power lines will go in, and the electrical switching station at Beacon Hill will be expanded.

Also, much of the post’s water and wastewater systems will be replaced, upgraded or repositioned.

Workers will drill eight new water wells that will be connected to the post’s water treatment plant. That’ll increase supplies by up to 240,000 gallons per day and help meet near-term water demand.

Crews will dig up old concrete water pipes and replace them with plastic piping less prone to line breaks.

New natural gas lines also will be laid and new lighting installed.

Also included are new sidewalks, bike lanes, jogging trails and road corridors.


Stripes in 7



around the web


Sign Up for Daily Headlines

Sign-up to receive a daily email of today’s top military news stories from Stars and Stripes and top news outlets from around the world.

Sign up