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Maj. Stacie Hatten and her husband Glen participate in the re-creation of a traditional Korean wedding during the Hannam Village Community Festival on Saturday.
Maj. Stacie Hatten and her husband Glen participate in the re-creation of a traditional Korean wedding during the Hannam Village Community Festival on Saturday. (T.D. Flack / S&S)
Maj. Stacie Hatten and her husband Glen participate in the re-creation of a traditional Korean wedding during the Hannam Village Community Festival on Saturday.
Maj. Stacie Hatten and her husband Glen participate in the re-creation of a traditional Korean wedding during the Hannam Village Community Festival on Saturday. (T.D. Flack / S&S)
Maj. Stacie Hatten participates in the re-creation of a traditional Korean wedding.
Maj. Stacie Hatten participates in the re-creation of a traditional Korean wedding. (T.D. Flack / S&S)
Base youths give a dance performance during the Hannam Village Community Festival on Saturday. The festival honored Korean history and traditions.
Base youths give a dance performance during the Hannam Village Community Festival on Saturday. The festival honored Korean history and traditions. (T.D. Flack / S&S)
A performer conducts the “daedong gut,” or shaman’s exorcism, during the Hannam Village Community Festival.
A performer conducts the “daedong gut,” or shaman’s exorcism, during the Hannam Village Community Festival. (T.D. Flack / S&S)
Maj. Stacie Hatten gets ready for the re-creation of a traditional Korean wedding.
Maj. Stacie Hatten gets ready for the re-creation of a traditional Korean wedding. (T.D. Flack / S&S)

HANNAM VILLAGE, Seoul — This U.S. military housing area was steeped in Korean history and tradition Saturday during the second annual Hannam Village Community Festival.

Members of the military community in Seoul who gathered on the athletic field here listened to gil-nori, or farmer’s music; watched daedong gut, or the shaman’s exorcism; and danced to a performance by members of the 8th Army band, who finished up the event, which ran from noon to 6 p.m.

The community also was invited to experience Korean culture at booths and shows.

Maj. Stacie Hatten and her husband Glen found themselves dressed as the bride and groom in the re-creation of a traditional Korean wedding.

“We’ve been married 10 years … so it seemed like kind of a good way to renew our vows,” she said while still dressed in the colorful bride’s costume.

Plenty of free samples of local kimchee, tea, pancakes and rice cakes were available. And kids and adults alike enjoyed a game in which the goal was to keep a weighted shuttlecock airborne by kicking it.

Kim Hee-jin, who works for festival sponsor Korea National Housing Corporation, said months of planning went into making the festival a success.

“I was really nervous before the day began,” she said. “But I’m enjoying it now.”

She said the weather, sunny and in the 70s, helped. Last year, she said, it rained and the festival was delayed slightly.

Just minutes after the festival wrapped up with drawings for free round-trip tickets to the States, most of the people were off the field and headed for home.

Stragglers, however, found themselves soaked as a heavy rain hit with the sunset.

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