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Gerald D. Keener, photographed in March 2004, was director of logistics with the U.S. Army Garrison- Daegu at Camp Henry in South Korea until his death from cancer last month at age 65. Keener, a Vietnam veteran and retired Army master sergeant, will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Gerald D. Keener, photographed in March 2004, was director of logistics with the U.S. Army Garrison- Daegu at Camp Henry in South Korea until his death from cancer last month at age 65. Keener, a Vietnam veteran and retired Army master sergeant, will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery. (Kevin Jackson / Courtesy of U.S. Army)

PYEONGTAEK, South Korea — A Vietnam veteran and longtime Army employee who died recently in Daegu will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery, the Army said Thursday.

Gerald D. Keener, director of logistics with the U.S. Army Garrison-Daegu, also has been awarded posthumously the Superior Civilian Service Medal, the Army said.

Keener was 65. He died of cancer March 30 at Dongsan Hospital in Daegu and is to be interred at Arlington on April 19, Daegu garrison spokesman Kevin Jackson said Thursday.

Keener served more than 25 years in the Army, from 1958 to 1984, and retired as a master sergeant. He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal and the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry, among other decorations.

As director of logistics at Camp Henry, he provided supply, transportation and other support to six installations and 11 other sites, 42 tenant units and agencies and more than 10,000 servicemembers, civilians and family members throughout Area IV in the southeast of the peninsula, Jackson said.

He managed an annual budget of more than $8 million and oversaw the operation of three transportation motor pools and more than 600 vehicles.

Also among his responsibilities was providing shelter and other “life support” services to troops taking part in such major annual military exercises as Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration and Ulchi Focus Lens, Jackson said.

In eulogizing Keener during an April 5 memorial service at Camp Walker in Daegu, Army Col. John E. Dumoulin Jr. called him an “old soldier” who took “particular pride in serving soldiers.” Dumoulin is commanding officer of the U.S. Army Garrison-Daegu.

“Gerry was an outstanding leader,” Dumoulin said. “He anticipated issues and had answers every time I had a question. He was also great at closing the loop with customers. He wouldn’t sleep nights if he didn’t.”

It was “the terrible habit of smoking, which ultimately led to his demise,” said Dumoulin, who had visited Keener in the hospital.

“The last time I saw him,” said Dumoulin, “he had a brief reprieve from his chemotherapy treatments and he was telling me that he just had a good steak. He was really enthusiastic about it — in typical Gerry Keener style.”

Keener began his civil service career in 1985 as a transportation operations officer with the 20th Area Support Group at Camp Henry.

Other than a short stint at Camp Zama, Japan, from December 1986 to April 1987, Keener spent his entire civil service career in Daegu, Jackson said.

He earned numerous civil service awards, including the Commander’s Award for Civilian Service, twice; the Department of the Army Achievement Medal for Civilian Service; a Sustained Superior Performance Award, and four Special Act or Service Awards.

Keener was a native of Rosemount, W.Va. He is survived by his wife and sons, Bryant and Edward.


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