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Maj. Gen. Steve Sargeant, the deputy chief of staff for U.S. Forces Korea, talked Wednesday to the 200 airmen who work at Yongsan Garrison. Sargeant used the quarterly address to talk about building camaraderie, improving fitness and preparing for a USFK-wide staging exercise in March.

Maj. Gen. Steve Sargeant, the deputy chief of staff for U.S. Forces Korea, talked Wednesday to the 200 airmen who work at Yongsan Garrison. Sargeant used the quarterly address to talk about building camaraderie, improving fitness and preparing for a USFK-wide staging exercise in March. (Teri Weaver / S&S)

Maj. Gen. Steve Sargeant, the deputy chief of staff for U.S. Forces Korea, talked Wednesday to the 200 airmen who work at Yongsan Garrison. Sargeant used the quarterly address to talk about building camaraderie, improving fitness and preparing for a USFK-wide staging exercise in March.

Maj. Gen. Steve Sargeant, the deputy chief of staff for U.S. Forces Korea, talked Wednesday to the 200 airmen who work at Yongsan Garrison. Sargeant used the quarterly address to talk about building camaraderie, improving fitness and preparing for a USFK-wide staging exercise in March. (Teri Weaver / S&S)

Maj. Gen. Steve Sargeant challenged some of the airmen stationed at Yongsan Garrion to 20 "spirit" push-ups at the end of his commander's call Wednesday afternoon.

Maj. Gen. Steve Sargeant challenged some of the airmen stationed at Yongsan Garrion to 20 "spirit" push-ups at the end of his commander's call Wednesday afternoon. (Teri Weaver / S&S)

YONGSAN GARRISON, South Korea — Only one of the 200 U.S. airmen who work at Yongsan Garrison is in jeopardy of losing his or her commission as the Air Force tries to downsize its officer roster worldwide, according to the top airman at this headquarters base in South Korea.

The Air Force is trying to reduce its staffing by 4,000 officers worldwide, Maj. Gen. Steve Sargeant, the deputy chief of staff for U.S. Forces Korea, told the 200 airmen at Yongsan during a quarterly update Wednesday afternoon.

Some officers already have been offered the option of canceling their contracts without penalty, or to switch branches or move to the Reserve or National Guard, he said.

“Some went, but not enough,” said Sargeant, who came to USFK last summer.

Soon, the Air Force will begin downsizing systematically, and Sargeant took the opportunity at his “commander’s call” to urge officers to avoid complacency.

“For right now, we’re in pretty decent shape,” he said. “But you need to be aware of it.”

Sargeant also used the hourlong meeting to talk up the Air Force’s new secretary, Michael W. Wynne, and encourage Yongsan airmen to get ready for June’s physical fitness test and to seek out camaraderie and activities during the winter months.

Sargeant reminded the airmen of phone numbers for chaplains, help hot lines and sexual abuse counselors. He especially emphasized the last category, and urged people to seek help if they needed it.

Sexual abuse has gotten a lot of attention in the past two years, he said. “And for good reason.”

Four people were also recognized for their work in the third quarter of 2005: Senior Airman Tamika N. Spigner; Staff Sgt. Steven D. Widmer; Master Sgt. Wintfred A. Davis III; and Capt Duncan Leuenberger.


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