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Find your groove and your instrument at the Musikmesse in Frankfurt

By MICHAEL ABRAMS | STARS AND STRIPES Published: April 12, 2018

For those who are interested in music or play an instrument or are looking to buy one, the Musikmesse in Frankfurt is just about the center of the universe.

Billed as one of the largest music trade fairs, it is expected to draw some 50,000 visitors to the fairgrounds in this central German city.

The main attraction is all the musical instruments you can imagine. From tiny piccolos to the largest saxophone in the world that can be played by one person, they all can be found here. Pianos, keyboards, woodwinds, brass, guitars, violins, cellos and percussion instruments can be seen and tried.

Looking for a new trumpet? Just bring your mouthpiece with you and blow away.

Want to introduce your kids to music? In Hall 10 there is a section called ‘’Discovering Music,’’ where youngsters can test a variety of instruments.

For fans of electric guitars, check out the “World of Vintage Guitars,” where the history of Fender guitars is on display.

Another fun feature at Musikmesse is live music. On stages throughout the fairgrounds you can catch a variety of concerts, from quiet acoustic sets to guitar-shredding heavy metal.

If all the walking and music makes you hungry, check out the bevy of food trucks set up between the exposition halls.

The Musikmesse runs through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the fairgrounds (Messe) in Frankfurt. Tickets can be bought online for 15 euros ($19) at musik.messefrankfurt.com. If you live in an area serviced by the local RMV public transportation company — which includes Wiesbaden — you can travel free with the ticket.

A family ticket for two adults and up to three children, which costs 30 euros, can be bought at the box office only.

abrams.mike@stripes.com
Twitter: @stripes_photog

 

Musicians do what they do best at the Musikmesse in Frankfurt, Germany — play music. The instrument at center is called a hangar. It offers 7 tunable playing surfaces to the player, who in this case is percussionist Tony Liotta.
MICHAEL ABRAMS/STARS AND STRIPES

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