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Here's what V-E Day looked like

By STARS AND STRIPES Published: May 7, 2020

On Friday, the world marks the 75th anniversary of Nazi Germany’s defeat in World War II. The day's events will include a virtual wreath laying in Belgium. Here's a look back at Victory in Europe Day on May 8, 1945, as well of some of the events surrounding it.

The footage above, shot by U.S. servicemembers in Paris on V-E Day, is one of several videos, including some in color, from the National Archives.

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The revelers hold a copy of the May 8, 1945, London edition of The Stars and Stripes during a Victory in Europe day celebration.
STARS AND STRIPES

Col. Gen. Paul Stumpff signs the surrender terms for the Luftwaffe, Germany's air force, early May 9, 1945, in Berlin. The combined chiefs of the German army, navy and air force signed the formal ratification of the Third Reich's unconditional surrender in Berlin before Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur Tedder, representing Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, commander of all Allied forces, and Marshal Georgi Konstantinovich Zhukov, deputy commmander-in-chief of the Soviet Forces. The event took place two days after a document was signed by German officials in Reims, France, and announced the following day, May 8.
U.S. SIGNAL CORPS

Col. Gen. Gustaf Jodl, German chief of staff to Adm. Karl Doenitz, reads the document of unconditional surrender of Germany to the Allies, which he is about to sign at 2:42 a.m. May 7, 1945, in the war room at Forward Headquarters of Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Forces at Reims, France. Under the instrument of surrender all German armed forces were bound to lay down their arms on all fronts. On Jodl's left is Adm. Hans-Georg von Friedeburg of the German navy, and on his right is Maj. Wilhelm Oxenius of the German general staff. Standing behind von Friedeburg is British Maj. Gen. K.W.D. Strong of the staff of Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force. At the far left is Col. Ivan Zenkovitch, aide to Major General of Artillery Ican Susloparoff, who signed the document of surrender on behalf of the Soviet High Command.
U.S. SIGNAL CORPS

Used as Russian headquarters, this Great Hall of the German Military Engineering, Berlin, was the site of the signing of the surrender agreement in the German capital, May 9, 1945.
U.S. SIGNAL CORPS

Marshal Georgi Konstantinovich Zhukov, deputy commander-in-chief of the Soviet forces, signs the formal unconditional surrender by German forces on May 9, 1945. The event took place two days after a document was signed by German officials in Reims, France, and announced the following day, May 8.
U.S. SIGNAL CORPS

Four military policemen take a break along a German road to read in The Stars and Stripes newspaper about the Nazi surrender, ending World War II in Europe.
U.S. ARMY

Field Marshal Wilhelm Keitel signing the German surrender in Berlin, on May 9, 1945. The event took place two days after a document was signed by German officials in Reims, France, and announced the following day, May 8.
NATIONAL ARCHIVES

U.S. Lt. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith, chief of staff to General of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Commander-in-Chief Allied Expeditionary Force signs on behalf of the Allied High Command the document of unconditional surrender of Germany, after it had been signed by the representatives of the German government sitting at the table across from him. The unconditional surrender of Germany was signed at 2:41 a.m. May 7, 1945, at Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force, Forward Headquarters, at Reims, France. On Smith's right is British Adm. Harold M. Burrough, commander-in-chief, Allied Naval Expeditionary Forces, and on his left are Maj. Gen. Ivan Susloparoff, of the Russian Artillery, who signed the document on behalf of the Soviet High Command, and Gen. Carl A. Spaatz, commanding general, U.S. Strategic Air Forces.
U.S. SIGNAL CORPS

The Stars and Stripes on V-E Day, Tuesday, May 8, 1945
STARS AND STRIPES

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