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Korea District committee member and event emcee Marc Garduno prepares to present this year’s Eagle Scouts with a special Far East District shoulder patch featuring an Eagle Scout insignia at the 2nd Annual 2007 Eagle Scout Recognition Dinner on Friday at the Dragon Hill Lodge.
Korea District committee member and event emcee Marc Garduno prepares to present this year’s Eagle Scouts with a special Far East District shoulder patch featuring an Eagle Scout insignia at the 2nd Annual 2007 Eagle Scout Recognition Dinner on Friday at the Dragon Hill Lodge. (Jimmy Norris / S&S)
Korea District committee member and event emcee Marc Garduno prepares to present this year’s Eagle Scouts with a special Far East District shoulder patch featuring an Eagle Scout insignia at the 2nd Annual 2007 Eagle Scout Recognition Dinner on Friday at the Dragon Hill Lodge.
Korea District committee member and event emcee Marc Garduno prepares to present this year’s Eagle Scouts with a special Far East District shoulder patch featuring an Eagle Scout insignia at the 2nd Annual 2007 Eagle Scout Recognition Dinner on Friday at the Dragon Hill Lodge. (Jimmy Norris / S&S)
Eagle Scouts attending the 2nd annual Eagle Scout Recognition Dinner recite the Eagle Scout Oath.
Eagle Scouts attending the 2nd annual Eagle Scout Recognition Dinner recite the Eagle Scout Oath. ()

YONGSAN GARRISON, South Korea — About 70 Boy Scouts, their leaders and family members gathered at Yongsan Garrison’s Dragon Hill Lodge on Saturday for those who achieved Scouting’s highest honor.

The 2nd Annual Eagle Scout Recognition Dinner was held to recognize 12 South Korea-based Scouts who had achieved the rank of Eagle Scout in 2007.

“It’s important to the young to invest in their futures,” Korea District committee member Marc Garduno told the gathering. “Their accomplishments put in place the building blocks of that future. This event is to recognize those accomplishments.”

The honorees also received distinctive Far East Council shoulder patches with the Eagle Scout insignia on them and coins from the event’s guest speaker, 8th U.S. Army Commander Lt. Gen. David Valcourt.

“I don’t think I would be a general officer today had I not first been a Scout,” said Valcourt, who said he earned the rank of Eagle Scout in 1967. “It’s something you have earned the old-fashioned way — the hard way. And no one can ever take that away from you.”

To earn the rank of Eagle, the Scouts had to hold various leadership positions within their troops, perform community service, attend a board and complete a project.

“I wanted to become more of a leader, and maybe a better role model to my friends,” said Joshua Colson of Troop 88. “It’s just a goal I’ve always wanted to reach.”

According to District Commissioner Brett Weigle, fewer than one percent of Boy Scouts earn the rank of Eagle Scout.

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