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At Camp Humphreys, South Korea, workers prepare to pour concrete for part of a twin, six-story barracks-dining hall complex, set to open in February 2006. Each barracks building will house up to 204 troops at the U.S. Army helicopter base, which is set for major expansion in the coming years as the U.S. military shifts thousands of troops south into the Camp Humphreys area.

At Camp Humphreys, South Korea, workers prepare to pour concrete for part of a twin, six-story barracks-dining hall complex, set to open in February 2006. Each barracks building will house up to 204 troops at the U.S. Army helicopter base, which is set for major expansion in the coming years as the U.S. military shifts thousands of troops south into the Camp Humphreys area. (Courtesy of U.S. Army)

At Camp Humphreys, South Korea, workers prepare to pour concrete for part of a twin, six-story barracks-dining hall complex, set to open in February 2006. Each barracks building will house up to 204 troops at the U.S. Army helicopter base, which is set for major expansion in the coming years as the U.S. military shifts thousands of troops south into the Camp Humphreys area.

At Camp Humphreys, South Korea, workers prepare to pour concrete for part of a twin, six-story barracks-dining hall complex, set to open in February 2006. Each barracks building will house up to 204 troops at the U.S. Army helicopter base, which is set for major expansion in the coming years as the U.S. military shifts thousands of troops south into the Camp Humphreys area. (Courtesy of U.S. Army)

An artist's rendering of the twin six-story barracks-dining hall complex the Army is building at Camp Humphreys.

An artist's rendering of the twin six-story barracks-dining hall complex the Army is building at Camp Humphreys. (Courtesy of U.S. Army)

The Army at Camp Humphreys, South Korea, is building a twin six-story barracks-dining hall complex that will house and feed some of the thousands of additional troops eventually to be stationed at the base.

Set to open in February 2006, the $25 million project is one of many under way or planned for Camp Humphreys, a 1,230-acre U.S. Army helicopter base in the Anjung-ni section of Pyongtaek, about 45 miles south of Seoul, South Korea’s capital.

The complex is going up on a part of the base known as Zoeckler Station. Over the next two years, Camp Humphreys is slated for a major role in the U.S. military’s plans to reposition its forces on the Korean peninsula. Under agreements signed between the United States and South Korea, by 2007 the U.S. military will move from Yongsan Garrison in Seoul and shift the 7,000 troops there south to the Pyongtaek region.

Outdoor volleyball and basketball courts and a covered picnic area also are planned for the complex.

Both barracks buildings will house 204 troops in 102 rooms.

Each room will have a bathroom and shower to be shared by the two occupants, and wiring for phone, Internet and cable TV service.

Also in each building will be two elevators. Besides rooms on all six floors, plans call for an exercise room, laundry room, and mud room on the first floor.

“It’s an area where they can come in from the field and clean their boots, their … equipment,” said Greg H. Reiff, resident engineer, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Far East District resident office, Camp Humphreys. “It’s like a wash rack … gratings, hoses and hose bibs, so they don’t have to drag their gear into the barracks before they clean it,” Reiff said.

A common kitchen area is planned for the second floor; storage areas for the third, fourth and fifth; and a lounge for the sixth, Reiff said.

The one-story ground-floor dining hall will accommodate 800 diners. Among planned features are a carry-out food area and islands for a salad bar, hot and cold foods and other amenities now common in Army dining halls, Reiff said.

The Shin Il Construction Company Ltd., of Seoul, is building the complex under contract with the Corps of Engineers.

The project also will see construction of a communications building for the base and a set of electrical improvements.

“It’s good news because the facilities at Zoeckler Station are the older facilities and this will give a much better quality of life for the soldiers,” said Susan Barkley, public affairs chief for Camp Humphreys’ Area III Support Activity.

“We are anticipating more people who will need to be housed in that area,” she said.

Zoeckler Station currently is the site of the 527th Military Intelligence Battalion’s headquarters, said Barkley, but it was too early to know just which units ultimately would set up there.

“It would probably be for people who work in that vicinity and I don’t know if they would be MI or some other type of units,” Barkley said.


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