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Teen-oriented Christian discussion groups like this one held this summer at Camp Walker in Daegu, South Korea, will be a regular part of a new program called Club Beyond that began operating at Camp Walker last month.
Teen-oriented Christian discussion groups like this one held this summer at Camp Walker in Daegu, South Korea, will be a regular part of a new program called Club Beyond that began operating at Camp Walker last month. (Julie Coy / U.S. Army)

PYEONGTAEK, South Korea — A Christian youth ministry that focuses on military teens and their unique situation is now operating at the Army’s Camp Walker in Daegu, South Korea.

Called “Club Beyond,” the program offers Bible studies, religious retreats, lock-ins and overseas mission trips to teenagers from the U.S. Army’s Area IV.

Club Beyond is part of the nonprofit Military Community Youth Ministries, or MCYM, which has more than 65 full-time staff working in various countries, including South Korea, Germany, the United Kingdom and Italy.

Club Beyond began operating full-time from an office at the Camp Walker Chapel in August under contract with the Army’s Area IV Support Activity. Area IV, in southeastern South Korea, includes camps Walker, Henry and George in Daegu, Camp Carroll in Waegwan and Camp Hialeah in Busan.

“The purpose of the program is to provide a ministry to military teens that recognizes those unique situations that they have to deal with,” said Julie Coy, MCYM community director in Daegu. “They can be frequently uprooted from different settings and move to a completely different country or culture and try to make new friends, try to learn a new language.”

The program’s activities are open to teens of any or no religious faith or affiliation, Coy said.

While it emphasizes biblical Christian basics, it steers clear of doctrinal matters that may vary from one denomination or another, Coy said.

“What we offer is the basic tenets of the Christian faith,” she said.

“We just focus on Christianity, providing the teens with a foundation to move forward.”

At a Sunday group discussion planned for December “we will be talking about dealing with stress, depression and loneliness,” said Coy, all issues that emerged during discussion at a recent lock-in.

“In relation to Christianity,” the discussion will ask “how do you deal with these types of things?” Coy said. “What does the Bible say about this?”

Lock-ins are overnight events where teens agree beforehand to stay the entire night. Volleyball and other sports, snacks and group discussions are typical lock-in features.

Club Beyond also offers two weekly Bible studies, one a large group study that meets Sundays from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Camp Walker Chapel.

A small-group study meets Tuesdays from 3 to 4 p.m. at the Camp George Community Center.

“It’s just for those young people that want an in-depth study,” said Coy. “We will begin with the first book of the Bible. We will go verse-by-verse. And meet every week and just go through the entire Bible.”

Also planned are two retreats each year and an overseas mission trip.

“I think the benefit is getting to know about Christianity first, if you don’t have any idea about it or you have preconceived notions about it,” Coy said. “It’s taking that step forward about finding out what it’s all about. You can say, OK, this isn’t for me. But the first step is finding out for yourself.”

Coy said those wanting more information about Club Beyond can reach her by phone at 010-8695-4416 or (053) 210-6065 or by e-mail at: julie.coy@us.army.mil. MCYM maintains a Web site at: www.mcym.org.

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