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Matthew Welch (right), age 8, gets a tattoo painted on at the Third Annual Children’s Health and Safety Fair at Camp Zama by (left) Miki Nihipali, while Nicole Welch (center), Matthew's sister, watches.
Matthew Welch (right), age 8, gets a tattoo painted on at the Third Annual Children’s Health and Safety Fair at Camp Zama by (left) Miki Nihipali, while Nicole Welch (center), Matthew's sister, watches. (Jim Schulz / S&S)
Matthew Welch (right), age 8, gets a tattoo painted on at the Third Annual Children’s Health and Safety Fair at Camp Zama by (left) Miki Nihipali, while Nicole Welch (center), Matthew's sister, watches.
Matthew Welch (right), age 8, gets a tattoo painted on at the Third Annual Children’s Health and Safety Fair at Camp Zama by (left) Miki Nihipali, while Nicole Welch (center), Matthew's sister, watches. (Jim Schulz / S&S)
Tyler Hagey, age 10, takes the challenge and climbs a rock wall at Camp Zama during the Third Annual Children’s Health and Safety Fair Saturday.
Tyler Hagey, age 10, takes the challenge and climbs a rock wall at Camp Zama during the Third Annual Children’s Health and Safety Fair Saturday. (Jim Schulz / S&S)

CAMP ZAMA — More than 600 children and parents gathered here Saturday afternoon for the third annual Children’s Health and Safety Fair.

Activities such as a petting zoo, puppet show, fishing derby and a climbing wall were available for the children, as well as a model of a mouth after using chewing tobacco and the taking of children’s fingerprints for the parents to keep as a record.

The fair, organized by Army Community Services, provided an education opportunity to promote safety and wellness of children for both the children and the parents. It also was an opportunity for them to learn the services available to help them.

“It is good for community awareness,” said Wanda Abrams, Army Community Services director. “It helps parents to be aware and learn in order to protect them,” she said.

The fair took place to recognize April as Child Abuse Awareness Month and Month of the Military Child.

The event lets “communities know child abuse is not acceptable in the military community and that child abuse will not be tolerated,” said Charletta Zamora-Cruz, the Family Advocacy Program Manager.

The fair allowed children to learn what effects drinking and drugs can have and how being fit is important.

To that point, one activity had children wearing goggles to simulate intoxication.

“The ground was spinning,” said Lumariel Johnson, 10, after trying the obstacle course wearing the goggles. “I will read what I got after going home and teach her,” said Lumariel’s mother, Azusa.

Base services, such as dental, the fitness center, the military police and fire department participated to show what they have to offer for the children and the parents.

“It’s great. It is good for the kids and its important for their safety and wellness,” said Monica Cayanong, who came with her sons Jason, 12, and Joey, 4.

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