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Jamaal Mohn, a School Age Services employee, plays with children at a new child care center inside the 1st Replacement Company building on Yongsan Garrison, where servicemembers go for in-processing when they arrive in South Korea. Parents can drop their children off at the center during the two-day spouse orientation program.

Jamaal Mohn, a School Age Services employee, plays with children at a new child care center inside the 1st Replacement Company building on Yongsan Garrison, where servicemembers go for in-processing when they arrive in South Korea. Parents can drop their children off at the center during the two-day spouse orientation program. (Ashley Rowland / S&S)

Jamaal Mohn, a School Age Services employee, plays with children at a new child care center inside the 1st Replacement Company building on Yongsan Garrison, where servicemembers go for in-processing when they arrive in South Korea. Parents can drop their children off at the center during the two-day spouse orientation program.

Jamaal Mohn, a School Age Services employee, plays with children at a new child care center inside the 1st Replacement Company building on Yongsan Garrison, where servicemembers go for in-processing when they arrive in South Korea. Parents can drop their children off at the center during the two-day spouse orientation program. (Ashley Rowland / S&S)

Four-year-old David Brooks plays in a new child care room inside the 1st Replacement Company on Yongsan Garrison, where servicemembers in-process when they arrive in South Korea. Incoming servicemembers can leave their children there on Thursdays and Fridays during an orientation program. The room has a floor-to-ceiling glass wall that lets parents check on their children during the day.

Four-year-old David Brooks plays in a new child care room inside the 1st Replacement Company on Yongsan Garrison, where servicemembers in-process when they arrive in South Korea. Incoming servicemembers can leave their children there on Thursdays and Fridays during an orientation program. The room has a floor-to-ceiling glass wall that lets parents check on their children during the day. (Ashley Rowland / S&S)

YONGSAN GARRISON, South Korea — Something as simple as knowing a child is getting a snack can mean a lot to a busy parent.

Make that a parent who just arrived in Seoul and may still be living out of a suitcase.

For Maribel Brooks, knowing her 4-year-old son was fed while she was going through a military spouses’ orientation program Friday was a relief.

So was being able to check on him during the day, in the same building where she and her husband went through in-processing.

“It was really convenient to have easy access to him,” Brooks said. “I don’t have to go so far to see how he’s doing.”

The child-care room opened Thursday in the 1st Replacement Company, the same building where Area II servicemembers go through in-processing.

For the past year, that in-processing has included a five-day orientation program for new soldiers and their spouses.

The child-care room is open on Thursdays and Fridays, when both spouses have scheduled activities.

Parents can peek through the room’s floor-to-ceiling windows throughout the day to check on their children.

Children previously have been shuttled to Yongsan’s Child Development or School-Age Services centers while their parents attended orientation.

“We view this as a very positive step for families who are in transition,” said USFK spokesman Col. Franklin Childress.

“The Army just signed the Army Family Covenant document at Yongsan and this is a step towards fulfulling that covenant with our families.”

Renovating and furnishing the room cost $63,000, and staffing it will cost $60,000 per year.

The child care room is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursdays, and 8 a.m to 3 p.m. on Fridays.


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