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Sgt. 1st Class Steven R. Jenderseck, right, receives his Sgt. Audie Murphy Award from 8th Army commander Lt. Gen. Charles C. Campbell during a ceremony Friday at Yongsan Garrison, South Korea.

Sgt. 1st Class Steven R. Jenderseck, right, receives his Sgt. Audie Murphy Award from 8th Army commander Lt. Gen. Charles C. Campbell during a ceremony Friday at Yongsan Garrison, South Korea. (Teri Weaver / S&S)

Sgt. 1st Class Steven R. Jenderseck, right, receives his Sgt. Audie Murphy Award from 8th Army commander Lt. Gen. Charles C. Campbell during a ceremony Friday at Yongsan Garrison, South Korea.

Sgt. 1st Class Steven R. Jenderseck, right, receives his Sgt. Audie Murphy Award from 8th Army commander Lt. Gen. Charles C. Campbell during a ceremony Friday at Yongsan Garrison, South Korea. (Teri Weaver / S&S)

South Korean soldiers stand after receiving Gen. Paik Sun-yup Leadership Awards at a ceremony Friday at Yongsan Garrison.

South Korean soldiers stand after receiving Gen. Paik Sun-yup Leadership Awards at a ceremony Friday at Yongsan Garrison. (Teri Weaver / S&S)

A member of the South Korean Color Guard performs during Friday's ceremony at Yongsan Garrison.

A member of the South Korean Color Guard performs during Friday's ceremony at Yongsan Garrison. (Teri Weaver / S&S)

YONGSAN GARRISON, South Korea — Sgt. 1st Class Steven R. Jenderseck is the newest member of one of the most select clubs in the U.S. Army: The Sgt. Audie Murphy Club.

The honor, named after the most decorated soldier in American history, recognizes leadership and performance among noncommissioned officers. Jenderseck, of the 6th Battalion, 37th Field Artillery at Camp Stanley, said he was humbled by the award.

“I feel honored just to be among them,” he said after the ceremony Friday, referring to the many NCOs serving in South Korea and with the 2nd Infantry Division who already have earned the honor.

“It’s a pretty tough club to get into,” said U.S. Forces Korea Command Sgt. Maj. Troy Welch. “You’ve got to be all over your game to get into this club.”

Jenderseck said he spent about three months preparing for the tests and paperwork required to be considered for the recognition. Welch and 8th Army commander Lt. Gen. Charles C. Campbell presented him the award.

Also Friday, Olivia R. Williams-Turner received the Dr. Mary E. Walker Award, which recognizes volunteers.

Williams-Turner volunteers at the South Post Chapel with parents’ groups and works with the director of community activities for Area II. She retired last September after 21 years in the Army.

“It’s been wonderful,” she said of the award and of her volunteer work, which she does with her husband, Lt. Col. Michael Turner. “My service has not stopped.”

Friday’s ceremony at the multipurpose theater on South Post also recognized 12 Korean soldiers who earned the Gen. Paik Sun-yup Leadership Award. The award is named after the first South Korean officer to become a four-star general.

Paik was born in 1920 near Pyongyang but came south before the conflict began in 1950. He participated in all 10 major campaigns in the war and served twice as the South Korean army’s chief of staff after the war.

Cpl. Kim Chang-ik, 21, was one of the recipients of the Paik award, which judges a servicemember’s military knowledge, conduct, attitude and English-language skills.

“I am so honored to get this great prize as a KATUSA soldier,” said Kim, who serves as a Korean Augmentee to the U.S. Army. “Since I joined the Army I have achieved a lot of things, but one of the best things [is being] awarded the best prize.”

Cpl. Kim Yong-jae, 24, also received the award.

“I am very happy to be selected as a honoree to represent my unit and brigade,” he said after the ceremony. “I appreciate their support.”


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