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Soldiers from the 210th Fires Brigade perform a re-flagging ceremony at Camp Casey, South Korea, on Wednesday morning.
Soldiers from the 210th Fires Brigade perform a re-flagging ceremony at Camp Casey, South Korea, on Wednesday morning. (Christopher B. Stoltz / S&S)

CAMP CASEY, South Korea — The 2nd Infantry Division Fires Brigade closed up shop, then reappeared a few minutes later as the 210th Fires Brigade during a rare combination of deactivation and reactivation ceremonies Wednesday at Carey Gym.

The mission remains the same for the only fires brigade permanently based overseas, said commander Col. Matt Merrick.

“This is all in line with the Army’s big plan of transformation,” Merrick said.

In addition, the brigade’s 1st Battalion, 38th Field Artillery, Delta Battery now will be known as the 333rd Field Artillery’s F Battery. The 579th Signal Company was added to the brigade on Nov. 16.

The brigade also includes the 6th Battalion, 37th Field Artillery, and the 702nd Brigade Support Battalion.

The 210th will become one of six fires brigades throughout the Army, Merrick said. The relatively rare “reflagging” for a fires brigade may repeat itself when the 4th Infantry Division’s Fires Brigade returns from Iraq, he said.

The 2nd ID Fires Brigade began as the 2nd ID Division Artillery in 1912 and was deployed in WWI and WWII before fighting early in the Korean War. It has been permanently based in South Korea since 1965.

The brigade and its units include 1,000 commissioned, warrant and non-commissioned officers as well as 1,770 junior enlisted soldiers.

The 210th Fires Brigade, created in WWII as a field artillery brigade, participated in the Normandy landing. It was based mostly in West Germany during the Cold War and took part in Operation Desert Storm before being deactivated.

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