Subscribe
Tony Appleton, a town crier for hire, kept attendees updated loudly and often regarding what events were about to begin during the celebration.

Tony Appleton, a town crier for hire, kept attendees updated loudly and often regarding what events were about to begin during the celebration. (Geoff Ziezulewicz / S&S)

Tony Appleton, a town crier for hire, kept attendees updated loudly and often regarding what events were about to begin during the celebration.

Tony Appleton, a town crier for hire, kept attendees updated loudly and often regarding what events were about to begin during the celebration. (Geoff Ziezulewicz / S&S)

Crowds first heard the drone, then craned their necks as vintage aircraft made repearted flyovers during the celebration.

Crowds first heard the drone, then craned their necks as vintage aircraft made repearted flyovers during the celebration. (Geoff Ziezulewicz / S&S)

Senior Airman Angelina Dees of RAF Lakenheath's 48th Security Forces Squadron shows some local kids some training rifles the Air Force uses.

Senior Airman Angelina Dees of RAF Lakenheath's 48th Security Forces Squadron shows some local kids some training rifles the Air Force uses. (Geoff Ziezulewicz / S&S)

Hi Britain, it’s America.

Listen, we’re celebrating a big deal this year. Do you remember? Four hundred years ago, a British sea captain by the name of Bartholomew Gosnold founded a colony in Jamestown, Va.

I appreciate that. Your intrepid explorer basically birthed me among the spacious skies and amber waves of grain. Oh, and the purple mountain’s majesty. I forget about those sometimes.

Since Gosnold’s hometown, Bury St. Edmunds, celebrated the founding of Jamestown with the America 400 celebration on Sunday, I thought I’d drop you a line.

Yeah, we’ve had a rocky relationship. You didn’t like it when I was young and set out on my own in 1776, raging against your tea and taxes and whatnot.

You came back and tried to reassess control around 1812, but that didn’t work out.

Still, I think the turning point in our friendship was when we teamed up to knock out the Nazi hordes during World War II. To this day, all political and social differences aside, I think we’re still cool with each other. Don’t you?

Sure, you say chips and I say fries, but it’s still just a plate of unhealthy potatoes at the end of the day. We share a language and a curious fondness for each other’s cultures that other countries might not always understand.

But there’s me, going on again. At any rate, thanks for sending the good captain and his brave crew over to set up America’s foundation.

I think Tony Appleton, a town crier for hire at Sunday’s festival, said it best.

“It’s fantastic,” he said of the mixed British and American crowds, each getting a sampling off the other’s life. “This turnout shows that our relationship is still very, very special.”

— As told to Geoff Ziezulewicz

Sign Up for Daily Headlines

Sign-up to receive a daily email of today’s top military news stories from Stars and Stripes and top news outlets from around the world.

Sign up