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CNFJ Command Webmaster Jeffrey Doepp.
CNFJ Command Webmaster Jeffrey Doepp. (Allison Batdorff / S&S)

YOKOSUKA NAVAL BASE, Japan — Navy personnel picking up trash on a beach. Sailors painting an orphanage. Commander Naval Forces Japan’s take on the nuclear aircraft carrier slated to arrive to Yokosuka Naval Base in 2008.

Japanese folks might not find these stories in their local newspaper. So to get more “good news” out there, CNFJ launched an all-Kanji (Japanese characters) Web site in July 2004. It’s proven popular, said CNFJ Command webmaster Jeffrey Doepp; Internet surfers have hit the Web site more than 66,000 times to date.

“That means (if my math is correct) we had over 50,000 visitors in one year!” Doepp stated in an e-mail response. “Keep in mind we have done almost nothing to advertise the Web site exists.”

The site — www.kanji.cnfj.navy.mil — features news articles, announcements, news releases, biographies of CNFJ leaders and links to each of CNFJ’s five Japanese installations. Articles come from Navy public affairs and command publications and are translated by Japanese military contractors. Doepp posts the articles and updates the Web site daily, he said.

Traffic is steady, for the most part, Doepp said, adding that traffic surged after the Oct. 28 announcement that a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier would be forward deployed to Japan.

That was the only story that caused a stir, he said.

The site posted a news release about replacing the USS Kitty Hawk with a nuclear-powered carrier, a fact sheet on Nimitz-class carriers and statements from Rear Admiral James D. Kelly on the subject.

“We really didn’t know what to expect,” Doepp said. “Our only goal was to provide a vehicle for the countless ‘good news’ stories of our sailors’ activities in the Japanese community, to the Japanese community.”

A tally of 66,293 hits to date is a sign that the interest is out there, he said.

“It means that our ‘good news’ stories are being read by the Japanese public and our message is getting to them,” Doepp said. “The Navy Public Affairs team across Japan works very hard at getting the ‘good news’ stories told to the Navy. We just took it a step further by sharing them with our Japanese neighbors.”

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