Support our mission
The Plough Inn in Icklingham offers sophisticated dining and a wide-ranging menu.

The Plough Inn in Icklingham offers sophisticated dining and a wide-ranging menu. (Charlie Reed / S&S)

The Plough Inn in Icklingham offers sophisticated dining and a wide-ranging menu.

The Plough Inn in Icklingham offers sophisticated dining and a wide-ranging menu. (Charlie Reed / S&S)

The Plough Inn is worth a trip to the sleepy village of Icklingham, just outside Bury St. Edmunds.

The Plough Inn is worth a trip to the sleepy village of Icklingham, just outside Bury St. Edmunds. (Charlie Reed / S&S)

UK weekly edition, Wednesday, July 2, 2008

ICKLINGHAM — Serving up the perfect combination of quality food, hospitality and ambience, The Plough Inn is definitely worth a trip to this sleepy village just outside Bury St. Edmunds.

Set in the serene Suffolk countryside along the A1101, The Plough and the food it serves are sophisticated, but far from pretentious.

Managed by Sue and Rocke Davies, the pub is a favorite haunt among locals and Americans who keep the place busy all week long. (The steady stream of customers is a sure-fire sign the pub is a must.)

The two work as a team: Sue in the front of the inn, and Rocke in the kitchen. Their genuine passion for the place is evidenced in every dish and every detail of the newly refurbished inn, from the linen tablecloths to the soft lighting.

"A pub has to be a complete package to be successful," said Rocke, a self-taught chef whose dishes easily rival those served in the area’s finest dining establishments.

With a diverse menu ranging from British classics, such as cottage pie (9.95 pounds), to more exotic plates, such as chicken farcir (10.95 pounds), and a variety of vegetarian meals, including butternut-squash-and-thyme risotto (8.95 pounds) and Good Game Keepers Pie (10.95 pounds), The Plough is sure to please even those with the pickiest of palates.

The beef filet pie (10.95) and the fish pie (9.75 pounds) are two of the most requested items from regulars, he said.

And while the portions are hearty, make sure to save room for dessert. Whether it’s the raisin pancakes with rum sauce (3.50 pounds) or the orange and Cointreau bread-and-butter pudding (3.95), you can’t go wrong.

Though the pub offers a good selection of wine, cask ales, ciders and traditional brews, most patrons come in to eat.

"That’s the way pubs in England are going because of the smoking ban," Rocke said. "There are going to be fewer and fewer of the old-fashioned ‘boozers,’ as we say. People seem to be mainly coming in to eat."

And for Rocke, who serves daily specials but rarely changes the set menu, consistency is a big part of keeping customers coming back.

Take note: The Plough serves children only at lunch time and asks that cell phones be silenced while in the restaurant.

"We just wanted to be a place where people could come and enjoy themselves for a few hours without cell phones or kids running around," said Sue.

Although a few have balked at the rule, Sue said most people appreciate the relaxing, candle-lit dining experience The Plough offers by night.

"We try to do things that we would want when we go out," she said.

So, if you’re looking for a quiet but refined meal, whether it’s a special occasion or just a night out without the kids, stop by The Plough. It won’t disappoint.


Stripes in 7



around the web


Sign Up for Daily Headlines

Sign-up to receive a daily email of today’s top military news stories from Stars and Stripes and top news outlets from around the world.

Sign up