Support our mission
 
Lance Cpl.'s Tuong Lau, Jose Dina, Innocent Niangoran, and Pfc. Mikel Schaub (far right) are all smiles after they were sworn in as naturalized American citizens, Friday morning at Camp Foster. Sixty three others joined them in the naturalization ceremony to include spouses of service members.
Lance Cpl.'s Tuong Lau, Jose Dina, Innocent Niangoran, and Pfc. Mikel Schaub (far right) are all smiles after they were sworn in as naturalized American citizens, Friday morning at Camp Foster. Sixty three others joined them in the naturalization ceremony to include spouses of service members. (Matt Orr/Stars and Stripes)
Lance Cpl.'s Tuong Lau, Jose Dina, Innocent Niangoran, and Pfc. Mikel Schaub (far right) are all smiles after they were sworn in as naturalized American citizens, Friday morning at Camp Foster. Sixty three others joined them in the naturalization ceremony to include spouses of service members.
Lance Cpl.'s Tuong Lau, Jose Dina, Innocent Niangoran, and Pfc. Mikel Schaub (far right) are all smiles after they were sworn in as naturalized American citizens, Friday morning at Camp Foster. Sixty three others joined them in the naturalization ceremony to include spouses of service members. (Matt Orr/Stars and Stripes)
Twenty two year old, Lance Cpl. Sara Zayii, displays her naturalization certificate after the naturalization ceremony at Camp Foster, Friday. She was born in Iraq and came to the United States when she was 11 years old.
Twenty two year old, Lance Cpl. Sara Zayii, displays her naturalization certificate after the naturalization ceremony at Camp Foster, Friday. She was born in Iraq and came to the United States when she was 11 years old. (Matt Orr/Stars and Stripes)
Sixty-seven newly sworn in American citizens stand with guest speakers and honored guests after the conclusion of the naturalization ceremony at Camp Foster base theater Friday morning.
Sixty-seven newly sworn in American citizens stand with guest speakers and honored guests after the conclusion of the naturalization ceremony at Camp Foster base theater Friday morning. (Matt Orr/Stars and Stripes)
Twenty two year old, Lance Cpl. Sara Zayii, receives her naturalization certificate from U.S. Consul General, Mr. Raymond F. Greene during the naturalization ceremony Friday morning at the Camp Foster base theater.
Twenty two year old, Lance Cpl. Sara Zayii, receives her naturalization certificate from U.S. Consul General, Mr. Raymond F. Greene during the naturalization ceremony Friday morning at the Camp Foster base theater. (Matt Orr/Stars and Stripes)
Lance Cpl. Sara Zayii, recites the Pledge of Allegiance during the naturalization ceremony at Camp Foster Friday morning. She was one of 67 service members and spouses that became naturalized American citizens.
Lance Cpl. Sara Zayii, recites the Pledge of Allegiance during the naturalization ceremony at Camp Foster Friday morning. She was one of 67 service members and spouses that became naturalized American citizens. (Matt Orr/Stars and Stripes)
A Marine Corps color guard started things off at the naturalization ceremony at Camp Foster, Friday morning. Sixty-seven service members and spouses became naturalized American citizens during the ceremony.
A Marine Corps color guard started things off at the naturalization ceremony at Camp Foster, Friday morning. Sixty-seven service members and spouses became naturalized American citizens during the ceremony. (Matt Orr/Stars and Stripes)

CAMP FOSTER, Okinawa — Sixty-seven members of the military community became U.S. citizens Friday at Camp Foster.

During a short naturalization ceremony at the base theater, U.S. Consul General Raymond F. Greene welcomed the new citizens, who hail from countries such as the Ivory Coast, Fiji and Ghana.

At the conclusion of the ceremony the packed, theater gave a resounding applause of congratulations.

“I joined the military for the experience,” said Lance Cpl. Sara Zayii, 22, grinning with pride and clutching the red binder that held her naturalization certificate and a small American flag. “This is everybody’s dream to become naturalized.”

Zayii came to America from Iraq with her parents when she was 11.

“This means everything to me,” she said comparing life in America to Iraq. “It gives me the chance and opportunities to do so much more like go to school and get a job.”

Her smile said it all.

“It’s a great day,” Zayii said.

orrm@pstripes.osd.mil

Migrated

stars and stripes videos

around the web

Sign Up for Daily Headlines

Sign-up to receive a daily email of today’s top military news stories from Stars and Stripes and top news outlets from around the world.

Sign up