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Newly pinned chief petty officers are piped into the Chief Petty Officer’s Mess at the Fleet Theater on Yokosuka Naval Base. This marked the culmination of an arduous six-week induction process, ending the the Navy’s newest chief petty officers being presented their anchors and combination covers in pinning ceremonies conducted throughout the Navy.
Newly pinned chief petty officers are piped into the Chief Petty Officer’s Mess at the Fleet Theater on Yokosuka Naval Base. This marked the culmination of an arduous six-week induction process, ending the the Navy’s newest chief petty officers being presented their anchors and combination covers in pinning ceremonies conducted throughout the Navy. (Chris Fowler / S&S)
Newly pinned chief petty officers are piped into the Chief Petty Officer’s Mess at the Fleet Theater on Yokosuka Naval Base. This marked the culmination of an arduous six-week induction process, ending the the Navy’s newest chief petty officers being presented their anchors and combination covers in pinning ceremonies conducted throughout the Navy.
Newly pinned chief petty officers are piped into the Chief Petty Officer’s Mess at the Fleet Theater on Yokosuka Naval Base. This marked the culmination of an arduous six-week induction process, ending the the Navy’s newest chief petty officers being presented their anchors and combination covers in pinning ceremonies conducted throughout the Navy. (Chris Fowler / S&S)
After a six-week induction process, chief petty officer selects were presented their anchors, the symbol of the rank and title of a U.S. Navy chief petty officer.
After a six-week induction process, chief petty officer selects were presented their anchors, the symbol of the rank and title of a U.S. Navy chief petty officer. (Chris Fowler / S&S)

YOKOSUKA NAVAL BASE, Japan — Most are tired.

All are proud.

And as of Friday, they now are chief petty officers in the U.S. Navy.

After a six-week induction process that stressed teamwork, tradition and leadership, new chiefs across the Pacific donned their khakis and pinned on their anchors.

New Chief Petty Officer Charlie C. Odom III, one of 34 sailors who were pinned Friday at Camp Foster, Okinawa, said he was “tired, but very excited. I’m ready to start my new job on Monday.”

He called the promotion and induction process “very, very challenging but I was proud to be part of it.”

At the pinning ceremony on Yokosuka Naval Base, the guest speaker, Commander, Naval Forces Japan, Rear Adm. James Kelly, told the packed Fleet Theater that “there is no more powerful group of leaders in the Navy” than chief petty officers.

“They are the folks that people like me rely on to tell us when we are messing up and when we are on target,” Kelly said.

Having returned to Yokosuka two hours earlier, 29 sailors from USS Kitty Hawk, Destroyer Squadron 15, and Task Force 70 became chiefs during a ceremony on the aircraft carrier’s flight deck.

Chief Petty Officer Elison Talabong said making the rank was a “very humbling” process.

“There were a lot of things that I thought I knew that actually I didn’t know,” he said.

Stars and Stripes reporter Cindy Fisher contributed to this report.

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