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10 pieces of cold-weather gear troops love to love

U.S. Army Capt. Kevin Wiley warms up with a poncho liner at Shele Kalay in Afghanistan, Jan. 16, 2012.

KRISTINA TRULUCK/U.S. ARMY

By STARS AND STRIPES Published: February 1, 2019

Stars and Stripes reporter Chad Garland took to Twitter for a highly unscientific poll of servicemembers and veterans on their favorite “snivel gear” — that would be military slang for cold-weather equipment.

Here’s what they had to say.

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Woobie

Aka the poncho liner, this camouflage nylon polyester blanket is much beloved.

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Field jacket liner

Also known as a smoking jacket, it doubles as a pillow and in the olden days could be sewn into a wet-weather parka for added comfort.

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Five-button sweater

It’s a classic.

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Neck gaiter

Being covered nose to shoulders is underrated. Plus, there are many other possible uses.

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Pile cap

Chin straps forever.

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Silk weights

This thin lightweight layer was the most-mentioned long underwear.

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Beanie or watch cap

Regardless or whether you’re in the Army or a naval service, whether it’s fleece or wool, whether you call it a beanie or a watch cap, don’t disregard these head-warmers in cold weather.

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Waffle top

Another popular type of long underwear with its checked pattern for comfy insulating air pockets. Some people know it as a “grid fleece,” but soldiers have opinions on that.

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Overalls, mounted crewmen’s and aircrewmen’s

Hey, they’re 100 percent Aramid.

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Humvee heater hose

Whatever works.

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Bonus answers

That 'stache

As grown by author and Alaska Air National Guard rescue squadron commander Matthew Komatsu.

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Hands in pockets

Sure it’s not technically a piece of gear and certain staff noncommissioned officers might not agree, but Stars and Stripes reporter J.P. Lawrence recommends this.

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MRE heaters in your gloves

Also, your gloves are so much tastier than that veggie omelet.

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DD214?

More than one person mentioned their discharge paperwork.

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